Discussion:
[I] Naming cats - and odd feline behaviour!
(too old to reply)
Clare
2005-06-16 16:28:35 UTC
Permalink
Well, after nearly three weeks, I have finally named my cats. The boy
is now Mustrum, being firmly behind big dinners - even to the extent of
nicking other people's, and the girl is Esme. Well, they are getting
on, with the odd squabble and playfight, and she gives as good as she
gets. She could have been a Daisy, but I thought the Discworld theme
was better in the end.

However, I have noticed a worrying habit that one of them has. I don't
know which because it happened while I was out, but someone feline has
been eating the cotton ends - plastic and all - off some cotton buds!
Needless to say I was concerned for a while and removed the cotton buds
out of feline reach, but so far no ill effects have presented
themselves....

Has anyone else had this sort of thing happen?
Kimberley Verburg
2005-06-16 18:10:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Clare
However, I have noticed a worrying habit that one of them has. I don't
know which because it happened while I was out, but someone feline has
been eating the cotton ends - plastic and all - off some cotton buds!
Needless to say I was concerned for a while and removed the cotton buds
out of feline reach, but so far no ill effects have presented
themselves....
Then they're probably fine. On the other hand...I'd double-check any dark
corners in the house, especially corners full of wires. And don't walk
around with bare feet!
--
Kimberley Verburg
***@lspace.org
Brian Wakeling
2005-06-17 00:45:12 UTC
Permalink
In a speech called
Post by Clare
Well, after nearly three weeks, I have finally named my
cats. The boy is now Mustrum, being firmly behind big
dinners - even to the extent of nicking other people's, and
the girl is Esme. Well, they are getting on, with the odd
squabble and playfight, and she gives as good as she gets.
She could have been a Daisy, but I thought the Discworld
theme was better in the end.
However, I have noticed a worrying habit that one of them
has. I don't know which because it happened while I was
out, but someone feline has been eating the cotton ends -
plastic and all - off some cotton buds! Needless to say I
was concerned for a while and removed the cotton buds out
of feline reach, but so far no ill effects have presented
themselves....
Has anyone else had this sort of thing happen?
If it looks sufficiently like anything they vaguely remember
as being food, cats will try to eat it. Eventually, this boils
down to absolutely everything within a five mile radius of the
house.
--
Sabremeister Brian :-)
Use b dot wakeling at virgin dot net to reply
http://freespace.virgin.net/b.wakeling/index.html
Cycling home 12 miles every night after theatre gives you a
lot of time for introspection.
I don't want introspection, I want a bloody car!
Sofia
2005-06-17 22:52:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brian Wakeling
Post by Clare
Has anyone else had this sort of thing happen?
If it looks sufficiently like anything they vaguely remember
as being food, cats will try to eat it. Eventually, this boils
down to absolutely everything within a five mile radius of the
house.
I'd agree with this! Hubby's cat, Tibby, had this craving for all the
neighbours pets, (rabbits, hamsters, hedgehogs, and most small birds in
the area). All I ever remember my little mongrel destroying though, was my
teddy bears when he and hubby used to play tug-of-war with them.

I suggest in this case, you should either get yourself a scratching post
for your cats to play with - or substitute them for a dog.


Sofie
Werehatrack
2005-06-24 01:35:03 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 17 Jun 2005 01:45:12 +0100, "Brian Wakeling"
Post by Brian Wakeling
If it looks sufficiently like anything they vaguely remember
as being food, cats will try to eat it. Eventually, this boils
down to absolutely everything within a five mile radius of the
house.
With the possible exception of an opossum and, under certain
circumstances, an abandoned Yugo[1].




[1] There is, of course, essentially no other kind of Yugo at this
point, so the adjective may be superfluous.
--
Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
Some gardening required to reply via email.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
Brian {Hamilton Kelly}
2005-06-25 16:46:09 UTC
Permalink
On Friday, in article
Post by Werehatrack
With the possible exception of an opossum and, under certain
circumstances, an abandoned Yugo[1].
[1] There is, of course, essentially no other kind of Yugo at this
point, so the adjective may be superfluous.
I must concur that I've not seen any Yugos on the road for years now. At
one time (early-to-mid-1980s) this car achieved the dubious distinction
of 50% depreciation in the first year from new. One could tell how dodgy
they were: the Arfur Dalys of this world usually operate in the second-
hand car market, but some of them set up operations to sell these "cars"
new as well.
--
Brian {Hamilton Kelly} ***@dsl.co.uk
"Je n'ai fait celle-ci plus longue que parce que je n'ai pas eu
le loisir de la faire plus courte."
Blaise Pascal, /Lettres Provinciales/, 1657
Ross
2005-06-26 01:33:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brian {Hamilton Kelly}
On Friday, in article
Post by Werehatrack
With the possible exception of an opossum and, under certain
circumstances, an abandoned Yugo[1].
[1] There is, of course, essentially no other kind of Yugo at this
point, so the adjective may be superfluous.
I must concur that I've not seen any Yugos on the road for years now.
Oh, Gods. Yugos. The cars designed for people who thought Ladas were
much too posh and far too expensive. I wouldn't be surprised if they
were looked down on by Trabant owners, too; at least Trabbies would
go, even if they were made of cardboard.
Post by Brian {Hamilton Kelly}
one time (early-to-mid-1980s) this car achieved the dubious distinction
of 50% depreciation in the first year from new.
That little? You do surprise me. I didn't think they lasted that long!
--
Ross, in Lincoln
Reply-to address will bounce; replace "junk-trap" with "me" for e-mail
Arthur Hagen
2005-06-26 02:21:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ross
Oh, Gods. Yugos. The cars designed for people who thought Ladas were
much too posh and far too expensive. I wouldn't be surprised if they
were looked down on by Trabant owners, too; at least Trabbies would
go, even if they were made of cardboard.
The Yugo isn't that bad -- it's the improved *export* model of the
Zastava Fiat 128.

If you were really poor but needed a car, it's more likely that you'd go
for brands like Moskwitz, Skoda, DAF or Vespa.

Regards,
--
*Art
mcv
2005-06-17 09:07:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Clare
However, I have noticed a worrying habit that one of them has. I don't
know which because it happened while I was out, but someone feline has
been eating the cotton ends - plastic and all - off some cotton buds!
Needless to say I was concerned for a while and removed the cotton buds
out of feline reach, but so far no ill effects have presented
themselves....
Has anyone else had this sort of thing happen?
Bits of plastic bags are a popular snack around here. Especially if it's
a kind of plastic that makes noise when you touch it.


mcv.
Clare
2005-06-17 16:10:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by mcv
Post by Clare
However, I have noticed a worrying habit that one of them has. I don't
know which because it happened while I was out, but someone feline has
been eating the cotton ends - plastic and all - off some cotton buds!
Needless to say I was concerned for a while and removed the cotton buds
out of feline reach, but so far no ill effects have presented
themselves....
Has anyone else had this sort of thing happen?
Bits of plastic bags are a popular snack around here. Especially if it's
a kind of plastic that makes noise when you touch it.
We've already had this - the used foil wrappers from Whiskas cat food
have been removed from the dustbin and shredded. Not even the idea of
the flavour has been left on them! Also a container that at one time
had chicken in it was stolen from the bin in the same raid and stored
behind some seed compost until four this morning - when it was brought
out for further excited attention.

In the ensuing ruck, both cats wound themselves up to fever pitch,
starting fights and breaking a bowl. That woke me up, and I had to
separate them using the front room and the stairs. Esme spent about 90
minutes scratching the door and yowling. Needless to say I didn't get
any more sleep... They were best mates again this morning at
breakfast!

Tonight I am taking them outside for the first time. I think last
night was down to cabin fever, and I need sleep! Hopefully we can have
a meaningful discussion about road safety and the bonus of coming home
when I shout "Treat". This is already a winner, although Mustrum gets
a bit giddy around anything vaguely food related. :-)
Brian {Hamilton Kelly}
2005-06-17 23:37:44 UTC
Permalink
On 17 Jun, in article
Post by Clare
In the ensuing ruck, both cats wound themselves up to fever pitch,
starting fights and breaking a bowl. That woke me up, and I had to
separate them using the front room and the stairs.
A high-pressure cold-water hose is far more efficient means of effecting
separation.
--
Brian {Hamilton Kelly} ***@dsl.co.uk
"Je n'ai fait celle-ci plus longue que parce que je n'ai pas eu
le loisir de la faire plus courte."
Blaise Pascal, /Lettres Provinciales/, 1657
PDoc
2005-06-19 22:07:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brian {Hamilton Kelly}
On 17 Jun, in article
Post by Clare
In the ensuing ruck, both cats wound themselves up to fever pitch,
starting fights and breaking a bowl. That woke me up, and I had to
separate them using the front room and the stairs.
A high-pressure cold-water hose is far more efficient means of
effecting separation.
But throwing the whole front room, along with the stairs too, is a display
worthy of "Shock and Awe". That'll teach 'em. And if it dosn't, you still
got the loft, kitchen, and the loo as a last resort.
--
PDoc
Alchemist at large, no accidents in the lab since March...
http://www.cohesic.co.uk/blog/
Clare
2005-06-24 16:26:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by PDoc
Post by Brian {Hamilton Kelly}
On 17 Jun, in article
Post by Clare
In the ensuing ruck, both cats wound themselves up to fever pitch,
starting fights and breaking a bowl. That woke me up, and I had to
separate them using the front room and the stairs.
A high-pressure cold-water hose is far more efficient means of
effecting separation.
But throwing the whole front room, along with the stairs too, is a display
worthy of "Shock and Awe". That'll teach 'em. And if it dosn't, you still
got the loft, kitchen, and the loo as a last resort.
I think I'll save them for a special occasion! <GRIN>

A week on, they are both allowed out, which has significantly reduced
the feline cabin fever quotient. Mustrum is the chief expedition
leader. Esme gets to the gate, panics and then goes back in to sit
behind the cat-flap anxiously waiting for Mustrum. Sometimes she sits
so close to it he has to squeeze through lop-sided. Great fun to
watch!

Last Sunday he brought home some cooked chicken - I told him it would
have been more believable [that he had hunted it down] if it had been
raw. Then last night he brought in a song-thrush - dead, of course,
and a real shame because they are rare and I like birds that eat slugs
and snails. I had to bury it in the back yard, next to the one and
only mouse my old cat ever managed to catch!

So tonight I'm buying Mustrum a collar and bell. There will be no
apologies or replies to anyone who thinks this is cruel! The collar
will be safely adjusted and suitably smart for a wizard, and he will
still get to chase things. He doesn't need the extra food, and the
local bird population needs all the help it can get.
Paul E. Jamison
2005-06-25 00:38:03 UTC
Permalink
"Clare" <***@medphysics.leeds.ac.uk> wrote in message news:***@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
[snipperage]
Post by Clare
So tonight I'm buying Mustrum a collar and bell. There will be no
apologies or replies to anyone who thinks this is cruel! The collar
will be safely adjusted and suitably smart for a wizard, and he will
still get to chase things. He doesn't need the extra food, and the
local bird population needs all the help it can get.
No flames, but I'd suggest a breakaway collar, in case Mustrum catches it on
something - say, a bit of shrubbery - he won't choke himself to death in the
inevitable fit of panic. Of course, he may learn to remove it on purpose,
but at least he'll still be alive to look smug about it.

Paul
--
"Who reads, learns, lives the Ferret Way becomes keeper
of light, ennobling outer worlds from one within."
- a prophecy from the Ancients
Clare
2005-06-28 16:27:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul E. Jamison
[snipperage]
Post by Clare
So tonight I'm buying Mustrum a collar and bell. There will be no
apologies or replies to anyone who thinks this is cruel! The collar
will be safely adjusted and suitably smart for a wizard, and he will
still get to chase things. He doesn't need the extra food, and the
local bird population needs all the help it can get.
No flames, but I'd suggest a breakaway collar, in case Mustrum catches it on
something - say, a bit of shrubbery - he won't choke himself to death in the
inevitable fit of panic. Of course, he may learn to remove it on purpose,
but at least he'll still be alive to look smug about it.
Are you psychic? I found a collar with a safety catch and a smart
silver bell. He didn't seem to mind it, even when Tim started singing
"Jingle Bells" every time he walked!

The night I fitted the collar (Saturday) he went out in the dark for a
wander. Next morning, the collar was gone! On Sunday, after Tim's
birthday party, we got back to mine to find that there were feathers
all over the front room. There is no sign of beak, feet, entrails,
blood, etc Both cats still managed to eat all their tea. There have
been no suspicious sicked-up featherballs or dazed birds perched on
curtain-rails...

Should I treat bird-eating as self-sufficiency, or does it only count
as a snack?
Post by Paul E. Jamison
--
"Who reads, learns, lives the Ferret Way becomes keeper
of light, ennobling outer worlds from one within."
- a prophecy from the Ancients
CCA
2005-06-28 16:58:04 UTC
Permalink
Clare wrote:

[Cats]
Post by Clare
Should I treat bird-eating as self-sufficiency, or does it only count
as a snack?
Definitely a snack, as they probably won't do it all that often.
Good to hear that they're settling in :-)
CCA
Paul E. Jamison
2005-06-28 23:01:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Clare
Post by Paul E. Jamison
[snipperage]
Post by Clare
So tonight I'm buying Mustrum a collar and bell. There will be no
apologies or replies to anyone who thinks this is cruel! The collar
will be safely adjusted and suitably smart for a wizard, and he will
still get to chase things. He doesn't need the extra food, and the
local bird population needs all the help it can get.
No flames, but I'd suggest a breakaway collar, in case Mustrum catches it on
something - say, a bit of shrubbery - he won't choke himself to death in the
inevitable fit of panic. Of course, he may learn to remove it on purpose,
but at least he'll still be alive to look smug about it.
Are you psychic? I found a collar with a safety catch and a smart
silver bell. He didn't seem to mind it, even when Tim started singing
"Jingle Bells" every time he walked!
The night I fitted the collar (Saturday) he went out in the dark for a
wander. Next morning, the collar was gone! On Sunday, after Tim's
birthday party, we got back to mine to find that there were feathers
all over the front room. There is no sign of beak, feet, entrails,
blood, etc Both cats still managed to eat all their tea. There have
been no suspicious sicked-up featherballs or dazed birds perched on
curtain-rails...
Should I treat bird-eating as self-sufficiency, or does it only count
as a snack?
For some cats - the feral kind - critter-eating is self-sufficiency, and I
suspect that any cat with outdoor access is just one remove from its wild
ancestors, or at least its wild first cousins. However, I suspect that if
you were to wave an open can of catfood around, Mustrum would opine that
birds were just a snack, before he dug in.

And it was just a guess based on the general intelligence level of felines
(ie, higher than we give them credit).
--
"Who reads, learns, lives the Ferret Way becomes keeper
of light, ennobling outer worlds from one within."
- a prophecy from the Ancients
John Ewing
2005-06-29 22:20:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Clare
Post by Paul E. Jamison
[snipperage]
Post by Clare
So tonight I'm buying Mustrum a collar and bell. There will be no
apologies or replies to anyone who thinks this is cruel! The collar
will be safely adjusted and suitably smart for a wizard, and he will
still get to chase things. He doesn't need the extra food, and the
local bird population needs all the help it can get.
No flames, but I'd suggest a breakaway collar, in case Mustrum catches it on
something - say, a bit of shrubbery - he won't choke himself to death in the
inevitable fit of panic. Of course, he may learn to remove it on purpose,
but at least he'll still be alive to look smug about it.
Are you psychic? I found a collar with a safety catch and a smart
silver bell. He didn't seem to mind it, even when Tim started singing
"Jingle Bells" every time he walked!
The night I fitted the collar (Saturday) he went out in the dark for a
wander. Next morning, the collar was gone! On Sunday, after Tim's
birthday party, we got back to mine to find that there were feathers
all over the front room. There is no sign of beak, feet, entrails,
blood, etc Both cats still managed to eat all their tea. There have
been no suspicious sicked-up featherballs or dazed birds perched on
curtain-rails...
Should I treat bird-eating as self-sufficiency, or does it only count
as a snack?
How many feathers did you find? What size were they? I mean - a few
small feathers, and a sparrow may have been devoured, but if the
feathers were a metre long, then one has to ask - has any neighbour
lost a peacock?

I still remember my cat trying to grab something that looked like a
buzzard :-)

John
--
John Ewing
Glaschu / Glasgow
Alba / Scotland
mcv
2005-06-30 14:13:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Ewing
Post by Clare
Post by Paul E. Jamison
[snipperage]
Post by Clare
So tonight I'm buying Mustrum a collar and bell. There will be no
apologies or replies to anyone who thinks this is cruel! The collar
will be safely adjusted and suitably smart for a wizard, and he will
still get to chase things. He doesn't need the extra food, and the
local bird population needs all the help it can get.
No flames, but I'd suggest a breakaway collar, in case Mustrum catches it on
something - say, a bit of shrubbery - he won't choke himself to death in the
inevitable fit of panic. Of course, he may learn to remove it on purpose,
but at least he'll still be alive to look smug about it.
Are you psychic? I found a collar with a safety catch and a smart
silver bell. He didn't seem to mind it, even when Tim started singing
"Jingle Bells" every time he walked!
The night I fitted the collar (Saturday) he went out in the dark for a
wander. Next morning, the collar was gone! On Sunday, after Tim's
birthday party, we got back to mine to find that there were feathers
all over the front room. There is no sign of beak, feet, entrails,
blood, etc Both cats still managed to eat all their tea. There have
been no suspicious sicked-up featherballs or dazed birds perched on
curtain-rails...
Should I treat bird-eating as self-sufficiency, or does it only count
as a snack?
How many feathers did you find? What size were they? I mean - a few
small feathers, and a sparrow may have been devoured, but if the
feathers were a metre long, then one has to ask - has any neighbour
lost a peacock?
I still remember my cat trying to grab something that looked like a
buzzard :-)
I vaguely recall a story about a kitten jumping on a pheasant and the
pheasant flying away. Still carrying the kitten.

No idea if that happened in a story, in real life or in someone's
imagination, though.


mcv.
Terry Gareza
2005-07-01 10:11:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by mcv
Post by John Ewing
Post by Clare
Post by Paul E. Jamison
[snipperage]
Post by Clare
So tonight I'm buying Mustrum a collar and bell. There will be no
apologies or replies to anyone who thinks this is cruel! The collar
will be safely adjusted and suitably smart for a wizard, and he will
still get to chase things. He doesn't need the extra food, and the
local bird population needs all the help it can get.
No flames, but I'd suggest a breakaway collar, in case Mustrum catches it on
something - say, a bit of shrubbery - he won't choke himself to death in the
inevitable fit of panic. Of course, he may learn to remove it on purpose,
but at least he'll still be alive to look smug about it.
Are you psychic? I found a collar with a safety catch and a smart
silver bell. He didn't seem to mind it, even when Tim started singing
"Jingle Bells" every time he walked!
The night I fitted the collar (Saturday) he went out in the dark for a
wander. Next morning, the collar was gone! On Sunday, after Tim's
birthday party, we got back to mine to find that there were feathers
all over the front room. There is no sign of beak, feet, entrails,
blood, etc Both cats still managed to eat all their tea. There have
been no suspicious sicked-up featherballs or dazed birds perched on
curtain-rails...
Should I treat bird-eating as self-sufficiency, or does it only count
as a snack?
How many feathers did you find? What size were they? I mean - a few
small feathers, and a sparrow may have been devoured, but if the
feathers were a metre long, then one has to ask - has any neighbour
lost a peacock?
I still remember my cat trying to grab something that looked like a
buzzard :-)
I vaguely recall a story about a kitten jumping on a pheasant and the
pheasant flying away. Still carrying the kitten.
No idea if that happened in a story, in real life or in someone's
imagination, though.
mcv.
I once got to watch a cat stalking a deer. Our cat Shade was going tiptoe,
tiptoe, tiptoe towards this deer who was calmly munching grass. Shade crouches
down, ready to spring. The deer realizes there's something over yonder, turns
and ambles over to investigate. The deer gets her nose to within half a meter
of Shade, who suddenly realizes this is *one* *BIG* *mouse*, turns tail and
runs into the house.

I was laughing so hard it hurt. :-D
--
Please help my friend get her business going:
http://www.cafepress.com/rowanchisholm

Evil Overlord Rule #136: No matter how many shorts we have in the system, my
guards will be instructed to treat every surveillance camera malfunction as a
full-scale emergency.
Swedish Chef
2005-06-30 18:56:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Ewing
I still remember my cat trying to grab something that looked like a
buzzard :-)
We had one that went after a woodpecker, whilst it was pecking... managed
ot stun it into silence : )
--
---
Swedish Chef
The only thing I know, is that I don't know
Werehatrack
2005-06-24 01:36:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by mcv
Post by Clare
However, I have noticed a worrying habit that one of them has. I don't
know which because it happened while I was out, but someone feline has
been eating the cotton ends - plastic and all - off some cotton buds!
Needless to say I was concerned for a while and removed the cotton buds
out of feline reach, but so far no ill effects have presented
themselves....
Has anyone else had this sort of thing happen?
Bits of plastic bags are a popular snack around here. Especially if it's
a kind of plastic that makes noise when you touch it.
Ours chew on the ends of the rolls of packing tape in the dispensers
that I use when shipping things off.
--
Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
Some gardening required to reply via email.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
Midgardette
2005-06-25 03:58:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Werehatrack
Post by mcv
Bits of plastic bags are a popular snack around here. Especially if it's
a kind of plastic that makes noise when you touch it.
Ours chew on the ends of the rolls of packing tape in the dispensers
that I use when shipping things off.
You're lucky. Our two Siamese darlings open drawers and carry off rolled
socks. I think it reminds them of kittens. The socks end up all over...with
holes chewed in them of course. Oh, and only the black dress socks not the
white sports ones. You have to have standards.
mcv
2005-06-27 14:13:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Midgardette
Post by Werehatrack
Post by mcv
Bits of plastic bags are a popular snack around here. Especially if it's
a kind of plastic that makes noise when you touch it.
Ours chew on the ends of the rolls of packing tape in the dispensers
that I use when shipping things off.
You're lucky. Our two Siamese darlings open drawers and carry off rolled
socks. I think it reminds them of kittens. The socks end up all over...with
holes chewed in them of course. Oh, and only the black dress socks not the
white sports ones. You have to have standards.
My cat is a bit more civilised than that. He likes to drink tea.
From a teapot. (Cold, though.) Water, on the other hand, he prefers
directly from the tap. I suspect he wants to look like me.


mcv.
Midgardette
2005-06-28 02:08:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
Post by Werehatrack
Post by mcv
Bits of plastic bags are a popular snack around here. Especially if it's
a kind of plastic that makes noise when you touch it.
Ours chew on the ends of the rolls of packing tape in the dispensers
that I use when shipping things off.
You're lucky. Our two Siamese darlings open drawers and carry off rolled
socks. I think it reminds them of kittens. The socks end up all over...with
holes chewed in them of course. Oh, and only the black dress socks not the
white sports ones. You have to have standards.
My cat is a bit more civilised than that. He likes to drink tea.
From a teapot. (Cold, though.) Water, on the other hand, he prefers
directly from the tap. I suspect he wants to look like me.
mcv.
Wouldn't it be more civilized to teach him to use a teacup (with extended
pinkie of course)? Any old moggie can use a saucer but a china cup says so
much more about one's deportment. Remember Teach's admonitions?

Midgardette
mcv
2005-06-28 13:48:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
Post by Werehatrack
Post by mcv
Bits of plastic bags are a popular snack around here. Especially if it's
a kind of plastic that makes noise when you touch it.
Ours chew on the ends of the rolls of packing tape in the dispensers
that I use when shipping things off.
You're lucky. Our two Siamese darlings open drawers and carry off rolled
socks. I think it reminds them of kittens. The socks end up all over...with
holes chewed in them of course. Oh, and only the black dress socks not the
white sports ones. You have to have standards.
My cat is a bit more civilised than that. He likes to drink tea.
From a teapot. (Cold, though.) Water, on the other hand, he prefers
directly from the tap. I suspect he wants to look like me.
Wouldn't it be more civilized to teach him to use a teacup (with extended
pinkie of course)? Any old moggie can use a saucer but a china cup says so
much more about one's deportment. Remember Teach's admonitions?
He only drinks from saucers if he's really thirsty or if it's milk.
In the past I've also given him water in a glass to get him to drink
the stuff.

I'll see if I have a tea cup somewhere (I always drink from a mug),
although I'd still have to pour it for him. And actually the tea is
meant for me, not him. The problem is that sometimes I don't finish
a pot completely, and as soon as I'm doing something else, he starts
spooning the tea up with his paw.


mcv.
Laura Melton
2005-06-28 23:48:33 UTC
Permalink
[cat drinking out of teapot]
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
Wouldn't it be more civilized to teach him to use a teacup (with extended
pinkie of course)? Any old moggie can use a saucer but a china cup says so
much more about one's deportment. Remember Teach's admonitions?
He only drinks from saucers if he's really thirsty or if it's milk.
In the past I've also given him water in a glass to get him to drink
the stuff.
I'll see if I have a tea cup somewhere (I always drink from a mug),
although I'd still have to pour it for him. And actually the tea is
meant for me, not him. The problem is that sometimes I don't finish
a pot completely, and as soon as I'm doing something else, he starts
spooning the tea up with his paw.
The cat I live with [1] does this too. If I have a fresh glass of
water, he'll walk straight over to it and stick his head in. If he
can't reach the water that way (usually because I've drunk it down too
far already), he'll stick his paw in to see how far down the water is.

It would be cute if it weren't so annoying. I have taken to drinking
out of a Nalgene bottle most of the time so that I don't have to protect
a water glass.


Laurabelle

[1] Not my cat, even as much as one may own a cat.
--
ASCII silly question, get a silly ANSI.
Midgardette
2005-06-29 00:10:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
My cat is a bit more civilised than that. He likes to drink tea.
From a teapot. (Cold, though.) Water, on the other hand, he prefers
directly from the tap. I suspect he wants to look like me.
Wouldn't it be more civilized to teach him to use a teacup (with extended
pinkie of course)? Any old moggie can use a saucer but a china cup says so
much more about one's deportment. Remember Teach's admonitions?
He only drinks from saucers if he's really thirsty or if it's milk.
In the past I've also given him water in a glass to get him to drink
the stuff.
I'll see if I have a tea cup somewhere (I always drink from a mug),
although I'd still have to pour it for him. And actually the tea is
meant for me, not him. The problem is that sometimes I don't finish
a pot completely, and as soon as I'm doing something else, he starts
spooning the tea up with his paw.
I know some folks are forced to use a mug, although it offends my
sensibilities (grin). At work I'm required to use a plastic (shudder) mug
with a snap down lid. (Seems computers haven't learned how to swim yet.
Haven't reached the level of Hex)

How on Disc did your cat learn to remove the lid?

Midgardette
)O( The Turtle Moves!
mcv
2005-06-29 09:21:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
My cat is a bit more civilised than that. He likes to drink tea.
From a teapot. (Cold, though.) Water, on the other hand, he prefers
directly from the tap. I suspect he wants to look like me.
Wouldn't it be more civilized to teach him to use a teacup (with extended
pinkie of course)? Any old moggie can use a saucer but a china cup says so
much more about one's deportment. Remember Teach's admonitions?
He only drinks from saucers if he's really thirsty or if it's milk.
In the past I've also given him water in a glass to get him to drink
the stuff.
I'll see if I have a tea cup somewhere (I always drink from a mug),
although I'd still have to pour it for him. And actually the tea is
meant for me, not him. The problem is that sometimes I don't finish
a pot completely, and as soon as I'm doing something else, he starts
spooning the tea up with his paw.
I know some folks are forced to use a mug, although it offends my
sensibilities (grin).
Why? A mug can hold more tea, which is good.
Post by Midgardette
At work I'm required to use a plastic (shudder) mug
with a snap down lid. (Seems computers haven't learned how to swim yet.
Haven't reached the level of Hex)
Plastic is bad. Computers are safe from tea if you learn not to knock
is over.
Post by Midgardette
How on Disc did your cat learn to remove the lid?
I don't use lids. I always use or misplace them. Besides, they're
plastic, which is technically bad.


mcv.
Midgardette
2005-06-30 01:39:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
He only drinks from saucers if he's really thirsty or if it's milk.
In the past I've also given him water in a glass to get him to drink
the stuff.
I'll see if I have a tea cup somewhere (I always drink from a mug),
although I'd still have to pour it for him. And actually the tea is
meant for me, not him. The problem is that sometimes I don't finish
a pot completely, and as soon as I'm doing something else, he starts
spooning the tea up with his paw.
I know some folks are forced to use a mug, although it offends my
sensibilities (grin).
Why? A mug can hold more tea, which is good.
The teapot is used for holding the tea. One uses the cup to drink from.
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
At work I'm required to use a plastic (shudder) mug
with a snap down lid. (Seems computers haven't learned how to swim yet.
Haven't reached the level of Hex)
Plastic is bad. Computers are safe from tea if you learn not to knock
is over.
Ahh there's the rub. Seems my cow-orkers haven't yet learned this and I'm
forced to abide by rules based on their limitations.
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
How on Disc did your cat learn to remove the lid?
I don't use lids. I always use or misplace them. Besides, they're
plastic, which is technically bad.
I see. Which side are you on in the china versus metal issue?

Midgardette
)O( The Turtle Moves
mcv
2005-06-30 14:10:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
He only drinks from saucers if he's really thirsty or if it's milk.
In the past I've also given him water in a glass to get him to drink
the stuff.
I'll see if I have a tea cup somewhere (I always drink from a mug),
although I'd still have to pour it for him. And actually the tea is
meant for me, not him. The problem is that sometimes I don't finish
a pot completely, and as soon as I'm doing something else, he starts
spooning the tea up with his paw.
I know some folks are forced to use a mug, although it offends my
sensibilities (grin).
Why? A mug can hold more tea, which is good.
The teapot is used for holding the tea. One uses the cup to drink from.
You can drink more from a mug.
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
How on Disc did your cat learn to remove the lid?
I don't use lids. I always use or misplace them. Besides, they're
plastic, which is technically bad.
I see. Which side are you on in the china versus metal issue?
My pots are glass, which is cheap and good and certainly better than
metal.


mcv.
Arthur Hagen
2005-06-30 17:44:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by mcv
My pots are glass, which is cheap and good and certainly better than
metal.
I read that as "grass" at first. Which made sense, for a different kind
of pot :-)

Regards,
--
*Art
Midgardette
2005-07-01 01:54:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
I know some folks are forced to use a mug, although it offends my
sensibilities (grin).
Why? A mug can hold more tea, which is good.
The teapot is used for holding the tea. One uses the cup to drink from.
You can drink more from a mug.
Can't argue with that. More is good. (^:"
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
How on Disc did your cat learn to remove the lid?
I don't use lids. I always use or misplace them. Besides, they're
plastic, which is technically bad.
I see. Which side are you on in the china versus metal issue?
My pots are glass, which is cheap and good and certainly better than
metal.
Same here, although my girlfriend, from Liverpool, swears by her aluminium
teapot. I've never been able to tell the difference between milk first and
milk after either.
Post by mcv
mcv.
Pardon me, but are you the same mcv who has art work on the L-space site?

Midgardette
The Turtle Moved...and I lost my place.
Flesh-eating Dragon
2005-07-01 10:26:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Midgardette
Same here, although my girlfriend, from Liverpool, swears by her aluminium
teapot. I've never been able to tell the difference between milk first and
milk after either.
The difference is that if you put the milk in after you can tell how
*much* milk you have actually put in (by the colour).

Adrian.
Arthur Hagen
2005-07-01 12:32:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Midgardette
Same here, although my girlfriend, from Liverpool, swears by her
aluminium teapot. I've never been able to tell the difference
between milk first and milk after either.
The difference is that if you put the milk in after you can tell how
*much* milk you have actually put in (by the colour).
I believe you're exactly wrong. Since you don't see the actual milk,
you can't judge how *much* milk you've put in -- how can you tell
whether it's 4cc or 6cc? If you pour it in the cup first, you can
easier estimate how much milk you've put in (though it makes it harder
to estimate how much *tea* you've put in.)

However, that's not all that important, as it's usually the *ratio* of
milk to tea that matters, and not how *much* milk. Unless you're on a
very strict diet.

As for the colour, the colour changes just as much whether you pour milk
in tea or tea in milk. If anything, there's less need for stirring if
you pour the milk in first. If you pour the milk in last, the milk
often goes straight down and mixes with tea at the middle of the cup
instead of what's on the surface. So you may think you've put in less
milk than what you actually have.

What matters to me is that the pot *and* cup should be pre-heated, the
milk should not be fridge cold, and it should be a cup, not a mug.
Serving people luke warm tea is an insult.

If you have guests, additional rules apply:
- Don't let any bag tags hang out of the tea pot. At least keep the
*illusion* that you actually made tea.
- Don't ask people whether they want tea and then serve them herbal tea
(i.e. anything not made with real tea leaves). It's like asking people
whether they want a drink, and then serve them carrot juice. While it
technically qualifies, it's a "no".
- Do not place biscuits on the saucer. Dirty an extra plate.

To Americans:
- There's no such thing as a tea mug.
- Dessert spoons are not tea spoons.
- Lumps of white sugar *can* be found at the grocery store.
- Real milk, however, can *not*. Either get ultra-pasteurized milk
without the usual additives or substitute it with light coffee cream or
half-and-half. Just let people know.
- Tea cups, like all other drinking vessels should be placed to the
*right* of the plate.
- Remember that what you call a biscuit, the rest of the world calls a
scone.
- Polite guests won't ask when they want more, and won't help
themselves even if you tell them to beforehand. You have to ask them,
or send the tray around whenever you see someone is out of something.

Regards,
--
*Art
Ingvar
2005-07-01 12:59:30 UTC
Permalink
"Arthur Hagen" <***@broomstick.com> writes:

[ SNIP ]
Post by Arthur Hagen
- There's no such thing as a tea mug.
No, my yellow half-litre cups are cups, not mugs.

They're absolutely perfect in size for a nice warming cuppa of lapsang
souchong (often, but not always, superior), gunpowder or kokei-cha.

Anything less and you need to refill too often. 3-4 cups see you wake
up in the morning, it does.

//Ingvar (safety notice: never *ever* mix kokei-cha and lapsang)
--
Q: What do you call a Discworld admin?
A: Chelonius Monk
Bigjobs
2005-07-01 13:17:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arthur Hagen
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Midgardette
Same here, although my girlfriend, from Liverpool, swears by her
aluminium teapot. I've never been able to tell the difference
between milk first and milk after either.
The difference is that if you put the milk in after you can tell how
*much* milk you have actually put in (by the colour).
I believe you're exactly wrong. Since you don't see the actual milk,
you can't judge how *much* milk you've put in -- how can you tell
whether it's 4cc or 6cc? If you pour it in the cup first, you can
easier estimate how much milk you've put in (though it makes it harder
to estimate how much *tea* you've put in.)
However, that's not all that important, as it's usually the *ratio* of
milk to tea that matters, and not how *much* milk. Unless you're on a
very strict diet.
As for the colour, the colour changes just as much whether you pour milk
in tea or tea in milk. If anything, there's less need for stirring if
you pour the milk in first. If you pour the milk in last, the milk
often goes straight down and mixes with tea at the middle of the cup
instead of what's on the surface. So you may think you've put in less
milk than what you actually have.
What matters to me is that the pot *and* cup should be pre-heated, the
milk should not be fridge cold, and it should be a cup, not a mug.
Serving people luke warm tea is an insult.
- Don't let any bag tags hang out of the tea pot. At least keep the
*illusion* that you actually made tea.
- Don't ask people whether they want tea and then serve them herbal tea
(i.e. anything not made with real tea leaves). It's like asking people
whether they want a drink, and then serve them carrot juice. While it
technically qualifies, it's a "no".
- Do not place biscuits on the saucer. Dirty an extra plate.
- There's no such thing as a tea mug.
- Dessert spoons are not tea spoons.
- Lumps of white sugar *can* be found at the grocery store.
- Real milk, however, can *not*. Either get ultra-pasteurized milk
without the usual additives or substitute it with light coffee cream or
half-and-half. Just let people know.
- Tea cups, like all other drinking vessels should be placed to the
*right* of the plate.
- Remember that what you call a biscuit, the rest of the world calls a
scone.
- Polite guests won't ask when they want more, and won't help
themselves even if you tell them to beforehand. You have to ask them,
or send the tray around whenever you see someone is out of something.
I'm coming round for a cup of tea sometime arthur.

No milk, half a sugar please.
--
Bigjobs
Flesh-eating Dragon
2005-07-01 13:54:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arthur Hagen
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Midgardette
Same here, although my girlfriend, from Liverpool, swears by her
aluminium teapot. I've never been able to tell the difference
between milk first and milk after either.
The difference is that if you put the milk in after you can tell how
*much* milk you have actually put in (by the colour).
I believe you're exactly wrong. Since you don't see the actual milk,
you can't judge how *much* milk you've put in -- how can you tell
whether it's 4cc or 6cc?
By knowing how much you put in, I mean knowing that you've put the
same amount in this time as you have on previous occasions (relative
to the other ingredients). I don't actually mean being able to name
the quantity.

It's true that you *can* put a precise, measured amount of milk in to
begin with, but it's not worth the effort. Out of tea (or coffee, for
that matter), water and milk, the third is the hardest item to control
how much you put in. Therefore, optimal control is achieved by putting
the water/tea in first, and then adding the milk until the mixture has
the desired appearance. I don't like to put the milk in first and then
add the other ingredients to achieve the desired appearance, because
if I get the milk wrong to begin with then the result will not fill
the mug elegantly.

A mug is a type of cup. If you drink tea/coffee out of a mug - as
wise and sensible people do - then you *are* in fact enjoying a cup of
the liquid, except that you are enjoying *more* of it than less wise
and sensible people who drink from a different, smaller type of cup,
which is not a mug. :-)

Adrian.

mcv
2005-07-01 11:45:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
I know some folks are forced to use a mug, although it offends my
sensibilities (grin).
Why? A mug can hold more tea, which is good.
The teapot is used for holding the tea. One uses the cup to drink from.
You can drink more from a mug.
Can't argue with that. More is good. (^:"
Exactly my point.

I'm actually surprised you're not pointing out that my tea gets cold
without a lid on the pot. Ofcourse answer would have been: only if
you fail to drink it in time.
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
How on Disc did your cat learn to remove the lid?
I don't use lids. I always use or misplace them. Besides, they're
plastic, which is technically bad.
I see. Which side are you on in the china versus metal issue?
My pots are glass, which is cheap and good and certainly better than
metal.
Same here, although my girlfriend, from Liverpool, swears by her aluminium
teapot. I've never been able to tell the difference between milk first and
milk after either.
Who cares about the difference? Both are wrong. Except perhaps for
young children. (Although I have to admit my sister drank her tea
with milk until she was 18.)
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
mcv.
Pardon me, but are you the same mcv who has art work on the L-space site?
Is it a mon^H^H^Hape behind a computer? I made something like that
as a design for an a.f.p t-shirt ages ago, just before disappearing
off the face of the earth.


mcv.
Werehatrack
2005-06-24 01:32:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Clare
However, I have noticed a worrying habit that one of them has. I don't
know which because it happened while I was out, but someone feline has
been eating the cotton ends - plastic and all - off some cotton buds!
Needless to say I was concerned for a while and removed the cotton buds
out of feline reach, but so far no ill effects have presented
themselves....
Has anyone else had this sort of thing happen?
It's not unusual. Before we banned the cats from the bedroom half of
the house, raids on the supplies of odd small items were frequent, and
the item you mentioned was frequently a target of the activities.
More than once, a trail of them was found scattered across the floor
in the hall, some clearly gnawed, and others just batted about until
thoroughly coated with dust and cat hair.

Sleeping (and such) is much more placid now, with the connecting door
kept shut.
--
Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
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