Discussion:
[I] Naming cats - and odd feline behaviour!
(too old to reply)
Clare
2005-06-16 16:28:35 UTC
Permalink
Well, after nearly three weeks, I have finally named my cats. The boy
is now Mustrum, being firmly behind big dinners - even to the extent of
nicking other people's, and the girl is Esme. Well, they are getting
on, with the odd squabble and playfight, and she gives as good as she
gets. She could have been a Daisy, but I thought the Discworld theme
was better in the end.

However, I have noticed a worrying habit that one of them has. I don't
know which because it happened while I was out, but someone feline has
been eating the cotton ends - plastic and all - off some cotton buds!
Needless to say I was concerned for a while and removed the cotton buds
out of feline reach, but so far no ill effects have presented
themselves....

Has anyone else had this sort of thing happen?
Kimberley Verburg
2005-06-16 18:10:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Clare
However, I have noticed a worrying habit that one of them has. I don't
know which because it happened while I was out, but someone feline has
been eating the cotton ends - plastic and all - off some cotton buds!
Needless to say I was concerned for a while and removed the cotton buds
out of feline reach, but so far no ill effects have presented
themselves....
Then they're probably fine. On the other hand...I'd double-check any dark
corners in the house, especially corners full of wires. And don't walk
around with bare feet!
--
Kimberley Verburg
***@lspace.org
Brian Wakeling
2005-06-17 00:45:12 UTC
Permalink
In a speech called
Post by Clare
Well, after nearly three weeks, I have finally named my
cats. The boy is now Mustrum, being firmly behind big
dinners - even to the extent of nicking other people's, and
the girl is Esme. Well, they are getting on, with the odd
squabble and playfight, and she gives as good as she gets.
She could have been a Daisy, but I thought the Discworld
theme was better in the end.
However, I have noticed a worrying habit that one of them
has. I don't know which because it happened while I was
out, but someone feline has been eating the cotton ends -
plastic and all - off some cotton buds! Needless to say I
was concerned for a while and removed the cotton buds out
of feline reach, but so far no ill effects have presented
themselves....
Has anyone else had this sort of thing happen?
If it looks sufficiently like anything they vaguely remember
as being food, cats will try to eat it. Eventually, this boils
down to absolutely everything within a five mile radius of the
house.
--
Sabremeister Brian :-)
Use b dot wakeling at virgin dot net to reply
http://freespace.virgin.net/b.wakeling/index.html
Cycling home 12 miles every night after theatre gives you a
lot of time for introspection.
I don't want introspection, I want a bloody car!
Sofia
2005-06-17 22:52:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brian Wakeling
Post by Clare
Has anyone else had this sort of thing happen?
If it looks sufficiently like anything they vaguely remember
as being food, cats will try to eat it. Eventually, this boils
down to absolutely everything within a five mile radius of the
house.
I'd agree with this! Hubby's cat, Tibby, had this craving for all the
neighbours pets, (rabbits, hamsters, hedgehogs, and most small birds in
the area). All I ever remember my little mongrel destroying though, was my
teddy bears when he and hubby used to play tug-of-war with them.

I suggest in this case, you should either get yourself a scratching post
for your cats to play with - or substitute them for a dog.


Sofie
Werehatrack
2005-06-24 01:35:03 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 17 Jun 2005 01:45:12 +0100, "Brian Wakeling"
Post by Brian Wakeling
If it looks sufficiently like anything they vaguely remember
as being food, cats will try to eat it. Eventually, this boils
down to absolutely everything within a five mile radius of the
house.
With the possible exception of an opossum and, under certain
circumstances, an abandoned Yugo[1].




[1] There is, of course, essentially no other kind of Yugo at this
point, so the adjective may be superfluous.
--
Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
Some gardening required to reply via email.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
Brian {Hamilton Kelly}
2005-06-25 16:46:09 UTC
Permalink
On Friday, in article
Post by Werehatrack
With the possible exception of an opossum and, under certain
circumstances, an abandoned Yugo[1].
[1] There is, of course, essentially no other kind of Yugo at this
point, so the adjective may be superfluous.
I must concur that I've not seen any Yugos on the road for years now. At
one time (early-to-mid-1980s) this car achieved the dubious distinction
of 50% depreciation in the first year from new. One could tell how dodgy
they were: the Arfur Dalys of this world usually operate in the second-
hand car market, but some of them set up operations to sell these "cars"
new as well.
--
Brian {Hamilton Kelly} ***@dsl.co.uk
"Je n'ai fait celle-ci plus longue que parce que je n'ai pas eu
le loisir de la faire plus courte."
Blaise Pascal, /Lettres Provinciales/, 1657
Ross
2005-06-26 01:33:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brian {Hamilton Kelly}
On Friday, in article
Post by Werehatrack
With the possible exception of an opossum and, under certain
circumstances, an abandoned Yugo[1].
[1] There is, of course, essentially no other kind of Yugo at this
point, so the adjective may be superfluous.
I must concur that I've not seen any Yugos on the road for years now.
Oh, Gods. Yugos. The cars designed for people who thought Ladas were
much too posh and far too expensive. I wouldn't be surprised if they
were looked down on by Trabant owners, too; at least Trabbies would
go, even if they were made of cardboard.
Post by Brian {Hamilton Kelly}
one time (early-to-mid-1980s) this car achieved the dubious distinction
of 50% depreciation in the first year from new.
That little? You do surprise me. I didn't think they lasted that long!
--
Ross, in Lincoln
Reply-to address will bounce; replace "junk-trap" with "me" for e-mail
Arthur Hagen
2005-06-26 02:21:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ross
Oh, Gods. Yugos. The cars designed for people who thought Ladas were
much too posh and far too expensive. I wouldn't be surprised if they
were looked down on by Trabant owners, too; at least Trabbies would
go, even if they were made of cardboard.
The Yugo isn't that bad -- it's the improved *export* model of the
Zastava Fiat 128.

If you were really poor but needed a car, it's more likely that you'd go
for brands like Moskwitz, Skoda, DAF or Vespa.

Regards,
--
*Art
mcv
2005-06-17 09:07:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Clare
However, I have noticed a worrying habit that one of them has. I don't
know which because it happened while I was out, but someone feline has
been eating the cotton ends - plastic and all - off some cotton buds!
Needless to say I was concerned for a while and removed the cotton buds
out of feline reach, but so far no ill effects have presented
themselves....
Has anyone else had this sort of thing happen?
Bits of plastic bags are a popular snack around here. Especially if it's
a kind of plastic that makes noise when you touch it.


mcv.
Clare
2005-06-17 16:10:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by mcv
Post by Clare
However, I have noticed a worrying habit that one of them has. I don't
know which because it happened while I was out, but someone feline has
been eating the cotton ends - plastic and all - off some cotton buds!
Needless to say I was concerned for a while and removed the cotton buds
out of feline reach, but so far no ill effects have presented
themselves....
Has anyone else had this sort of thing happen?
Bits of plastic bags are a popular snack around here. Especially if it's
a kind of plastic that makes noise when you touch it.
We've already had this - the used foil wrappers from Whiskas cat food
have been removed from the dustbin and shredded. Not even the idea of
the flavour has been left on them! Also a container that at one time
had chicken in it was stolen from the bin in the same raid and stored
behind some seed compost until four this morning - when it was brought
out for further excited attention.

In the ensuing ruck, both cats wound themselves up to fever pitch,
starting fights and breaking a bowl. That woke me up, and I had to
separate them using the front room and the stairs. Esme spent about 90
minutes scratching the door and yowling. Needless to say I didn't get
any more sleep... They were best mates again this morning at
breakfast!

Tonight I am taking them outside for the first time. I think last
night was down to cabin fever, and I need sleep! Hopefully we can have
a meaningful discussion about road safety and the bonus of coming home
when I shout "Treat". This is already a winner, although Mustrum gets
a bit giddy around anything vaguely food related. :-)
Brian {Hamilton Kelly}
2005-06-17 23:37:44 UTC
Permalink
On 17 Jun, in article
Post by Clare
In the ensuing ruck, both cats wound themselves up to fever pitch,
starting fights and breaking a bowl. That woke me up, and I had to
separate them using the front room and the stairs.
A high-pressure cold-water hose is far more efficient means of effecting
separation.
--
Brian {Hamilton Kelly} ***@dsl.co.uk
"Je n'ai fait celle-ci plus longue que parce que je n'ai pas eu
le loisir de la faire plus courte."
Blaise Pascal, /Lettres Provinciales/, 1657
PDoc
2005-06-19 22:07:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brian {Hamilton Kelly}
On 17 Jun, in article
Post by Clare
In the ensuing ruck, both cats wound themselves up to fever pitch,
starting fights and breaking a bowl. That woke me up, and I had to
separate them using the front room and the stairs.
A high-pressure cold-water hose is far more efficient means of
effecting separation.
But throwing the whole front room, along with the stairs too, is a display
worthy of "Shock and Awe". That'll teach 'em. And if it dosn't, you still
got the loft, kitchen, and the loo as a last resort.
--
PDoc
Alchemist at large, no accidents in the lab since March...
http://www.cohesic.co.uk/blog/
Clare
2005-06-24 16:26:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by PDoc
Post by Brian {Hamilton Kelly}
On 17 Jun, in article
Post by Clare
In the ensuing ruck, both cats wound themselves up to fever pitch,
starting fights and breaking a bowl. That woke me up, and I had to
separate them using the front room and the stairs.
A high-pressure cold-water hose is far more efficient means of
effecting separation.
But throwing the whole front room, along with the stairs too, is a display
worthy of "Shock and Awe". That'll teach 'em. And if it dosn't, you still
got the loft, kitchen, and the loo as a last resort.
I think I'll save them for a special occasion! <GRIN>

A week on, they are both allowed out, which has significantly reduced
the feline cabin fever quotient. Mustrum is the chief expedition
leader. Esme gets to the gate, panics and then goes back in to sit
behind the cat-flap anxiously waiting for Mustrum. Sometimes she sits
so close to it he has to squeeze through lop-sided. Great fun to
watch!

Last Sunday he brought home some cooked chicken - I told him it would
have been more believable [that he had hunted it down] if it had been
raw. Then last night he brought in a song-thrush - dead, of course,
and a real shame because they are rare and I like birds that eat slugs
and snails. I had to bury it in the back yard, next to the one and
only mouse my old cat ever managed to catch!

So tonight I'm buying Mustrum a collar and bell. There will be no
apologies or replies to anyone who thinks this is cruel! The collar
will be safely adjusted and suitably smart for a wizard, and he will
still get to chase things. He doesn't need the extra food, and the
local bird population needs all the help it can get.
Paul E. Jamison
2005-06-25 00:38:03 UTC
Permalink
"Clare" <***@medphysics.leeds.ac.uk> wrote in message news:***@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
[snipperage]
Post by Clare
So tonight I'm buying Mustrum a collar and bell. There will be no
apologies or replies to anyone who thinks this is cruel! The collar
will be safely adjusted and suitably smart for a wizard, and he will
still get to chase things. He doesn't need the extra food, and the
local bird population needs all the help it can get.
No flames, but I'd suggest a breakaway collar, in case Mustrum catches it on
something - say, a bit of shrubbery - he won't choke himself to death in the
inevitable fit of panic. Of course, he may learn to remove it on purpose,
but at least he'll still be alive to look smug about it.

Paul
--
"Who reads, learns, lives the Ferret Way becomes keeper
of light, ennobling outer worlds from one within."
- a prophecy from the Ancients
Clare
2005-06-28 16:27:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul E. Jamison
[snipperage]
Post by Clare
So tonight I'm buying Mustrum a collar and bell. There will be no
apologies or replies to anyone who thinks this is cruel! The collar
will be safely adjusted and suitably smart for a wizard, and he will
still get to chase things. He doesn't need the extra food, and the
local bird population needs all the help it can get.
No flames, but I'd suggest a breakaway collar, in case Mustrum catches it on
something - say, a bit of shrubbery - he won't choke himself to death in the
inevitable fit of panic. Of course, he may learn to remove it on purpose,
but at least he'll still be alive to look smug about it.
Are you psychic? I found a collar with a safety catch and a smart
silver bell. He didn't seem to mind it, even when Tim started singing
"Jingle Bells" every time he walked!

The night I fitted the collar (Saturday) he went out in the dark for a
wander. Next morning, the collar was gone! On Sunday, after Tim's
birthday party, we got back to mine to find that there were feathers
all over the front room. There is no sign of beak, feet, entrails,
blood, etc Both cats still managed to eat all their tea. There have
been no suspicious sicked-up featherballs or dazed birds perched on
curtain-rails...

Should I treat bird-eating as self-sufficiency, or does it only count
as a snack?
Post by Paul E. Jamison
--
"Who reads, learns, lives the Ferret Way becomes keeper
of light, ennobling outer worlds from one within."
- a prophecy from the Ancients
CCA
2005-06-28 16:58:04 UTC
Permalink
Clare wrote:

[Cats]
Post by Clare
Should I treat bird-eating as self-sufficiency, or does it only count
as a snack?
Definitely a snack, as they probably won't do it all that often.
Good to hear that they're settling in :-)
CCA
Paul E. Jamison
2005-06-28 23:01:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Clare
Post by Paul E. Jamison
[snipperage]
Post by Clare
So tonight I'm buying Mustrum a collar and bell. There will be no
apologies or replies to anyone who thinks this is cruel! The collar
will be safely adjusted and suitably smart for a wizard, and he will
still get to chase things. He doesn't need the extra food, and the
local bird population needs all the help it can get.
No flames, but I'd suggest a breakaway collar, in case Mustrum catches it on
something - say, a bit of shrubbery - he won't choke himself to death in the
inevitable fit of panic. Of course, he may learn to remove it on purpose,
but at least he'll still be alive to look smug about it.
Are you psychic? I found a collar with a safety catch and a smart
silver bell. He didn't seem to mind it, even when Tim started singing
"Jingle Bells" every time he walked!
The night I fitted the collar (Saturday) he went out in the dark for a
wander. Next morning, the collar was gone! On Sunday, after Tim's
birthday party, we got back to mine to find that there were feathers
all over the front room. There is no sign of beak, feet, entrails,
blood, etc Both cats still managed to eat all their tea. There have
been no suspicious sicked-up featherballs or dazed birds perched on
curtain-rails...
Should I treat bird-eating as self-sufficiency, or does it only count
as a snack?
For some cats - the feral kind - critter-eating is self-sufficiency, and I
suspect that any cat with outdoor access is just one remove from its wild
ancestors, or at least its wild first cousins. However, I suspect that if
you were to wave an open can of catfood around, Mustrum would opine that
birds were just a snack, before he dug in.

And it was just a guess based on the general intelligence level of felines
(ie, higher than we give them credit).
--
"Who reads, learns, lives the Ferret Way becomes keeper
of light, ennobling outer worlds from one within."
- a prophecy from the Ancients
John Ewing
2005-06-29 22:20:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Clare
Post by Paul E. Jamison
[snipperage]
Post by Clare
So tonight I'm buying Mustrum a collar and bell. There will be no
apologies or replies to anyone who thinks this is cruel! The collar
will be safely adjusted and suitably smart for a wizard, and he will
still get to chase things. He doesn't need the extra food, and the
local bird population needs all the help it can get.
No flames, but I'd suggest a breakaway collar, in case Mustrum catches it on
something - say, a bit of shrubbery - he won't choke himself to death in the
inevitable fit of panic. Of course, he may learn to remove it on purpose,
but at least he'll still be alive to look smug about it.
Are you psychic? I found a collar with a safety catch and a smart
silver bell. He didn't seem to mind it, even when Tim started singing
"Jingle Bells" every time he walked!
The night I fitted the collar (Saturday) he went out in the dark for a
wander. Next morning, the collar was gone! On Sunday, after Tim's
birthday party, we got back to mine to find that there were feathers
all over the front room. There is no sign of beak, feet, entrails,
blood, etc Both cats still managed to eat all their tea. There have
been no suspicious sicked-up featherballs or dazed birds perched on
curtain-rails...
Should I treat bird-eating as self-sufficiency, or does it only count
as a snack?
How many feathers did you find? What size were they? I mean - a few
small feathers, and a sparrow may have been devoured, but if the
feathers were a metre long, then one has to ask - has any neighbour
lost a peacock?

I still remember my cat trying to grab something that looked like a
buzzard :-)

John
--
John Ewing
Glaschu / Glasgow
Alba / Scotland
mcv
2005-06-30 14:13:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Ewing
Post by Clare
Post by Paul E. Jamison
[snipperage]
Post by Clare
So tonight I'm buying Mustrum a collar and bell. There will be no
apologies or replies to anyone who thinks this is cruel! The collar
will be safely adjusted and suitably smart for a wizard, and he will
still get to chase things. He doesn't need the extra food, and the
local bird population needs all the help it can get.
No flames, but I'd suggest a breakaway collar, in case Mustrum catches it on
something - say, a bit of shrubbery - he won't choke himself to death in the
inevitable fit of panic. Of course, he may learn to remove it on purpose,
but at least he'll still be alive to look smug about it.
Are you psychic? I found a collar with a safety catch and a smart
silver bell. He didn't seem to mind it, even when Tim started singing
"Jingle Bells" every time he walked!
The night I fitted the collar (Saturday) he went out in the dark for a
wander. Next morning, the collar was gone! On Sunday, after Tim's
birthday party, we got back to mine to find that there were feathers
all over the front room. There is no sign of beak, feet, entrails,
blood, etc Both cats still managed to eat all their tea. There have
been no suspicious sicked-up featherballs or dazed birds perched on
curtain-rails...
Should I treat bird-eating as self-sufficiency, or does it only count
as a snack?
How many feathers did you find? What size were they? I mean - a few
small feathers, and a sparrow may have been devoured, but if the
feathers were a metre long, then one has to ask - has any neighbour
lost a peacock?
I still remember my cat trying to grab something that looked like a
buzzard :-)
I vaguely recall a story about a kitten jumping on a pheasant and the
pheasant flying away. Still carrying the kitten.

No idea if that happened in a story, in real life or in someone's
imagination, though.


mcv.
Terry Gareza
2005-07-01 10:11:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by mcv
Post by John Ewing
Post by Clare
Post by Paul E. Jamison
[snipperage]
Post by Clare
So tonight I'm buying Mustrum a collar and bell. There will be no
apologies or replies to anyone who thinks this is cruel! The collar
will be safely adjusted and suitably smart for a wizard, and he will
still get to chase things. He doesn't need the extra food, and the
local bird population needs all the help it can get.
No flames, but I'd suggest a breakaway collar, in case Mustrum catches it on
something - say, a bit of shrubbery - he won't choke himself to death in the
inevitable fit of panic. Of course, he may learn to remove it on purpose,
but at least he'll still be alive to look smug about it.
Are you psychic? I found a collar with a safety catch and a smart
silver bell. He didn't seem to mind it, even when Tim started singing
"Jingle Bells" every time he walked!
The night I fitted the collar (Saturday) he went out in the dark for a
wander. Next morning, the collar was gone! On Sunday, after Tim's
birthday party, we got back to mine to find that there were feathers
all over the front room. There is no sign of beak, feet, entrails,
blood, etc Both cats still managed to eat all their tea. There have
been no suspicious sicked-up featherballs or dazed birds perched on
curtain-rails...
Should I treat bird-eating as self-sufficiency, or does it only count
as a snack?
How many feathers did you find? What size were they? I mean - a few
small feathers, and a sparrow may have been devoured, but if the
feathers were a metre long, then one has to ask - has any neighbour
lost a peacock?
I still remember my cat trying to grab something that looked like a
buzzard :-)
I vaguely recall a story about a kitten jumping on a pheasant and the
pheasant flying away. Still carrying the kitten.
No idea if that happened in a story, in real life or in someone's
imagination, though.
mcv.
I once got to watch a cat stalking a deer. Our cat Shade was going tiptoe,
tiptoe, tiptoe towards this deer who was calmly munching grass. Shade crouches
down, ready to spring. The deer realizes there's something over yonder, turns
and ambles over to investigate. The deer gets her nose to within half a meter
of Shade, who suddenly realizes this is *one* *BIG* *mouse*, turns tail and
runs into the house.

I was laughing so hard it hurt. :-D
--
Please help my friend get her business going:
http://www.cafepress.com/rowanchisholm

Evil Overlord Rule #136: No matter how many shorts we have in the system, my
guards will be instructed to treat every surveillance camera malfunction as a
full-scale emergency.
John Ewing
2005-07-01 19:49:20 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 01 Jul 2005 03:11:52 -0700, Terry Gareza <***@example.com>
wrote:

[snip]
Post by Terry Gareza
I once got to watch a cat stalking a deer. Our cat Shade was going tiptoe,
tiptoe, tiptoe towards this deer who was calmly munching grass. Shade crouches
down, ready to spring. The deer realizes there's something over yonder, turns
and ambles over to investigate. The deer gets her nose to within half a meter
of Shade, who suddenly realizes this is *one* *BIG* *mouse*, turns tail and
runs into the house.
Mouse, moose, what's the odds? :-)

John
--
John Ewing
Glaschu / Glasgow
Alba / Scotland
Lesley Weston
2005-07-02 02:22:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Ewing
[snip]
Post by Terry Gareza
I once got to watch a cat stalking a deer. Our cat Shade was going tiptoe,
tiptoe, tiptoe towards this deer who was calmly munching grass. Shade crouches
down, ready to spring. The deer realizes there's something over yonder, turns
and ambles over to investigate. The deer gets her nose to within half a meter
of Shade, who suddenly realizes this is *one* *BIG* *mouse*, turns tail and
runs into the house.
Mouse, moose, what's the odds? :-)
They're all truly tremendous meeces.
--
Lesley Weston.

Brightly_coloured_blob is real, but I don't often check even the few bits
that get through Yahoo's filters. To reach me, use leswes att shaw dott ca,
changing spelling and spacing as required.
Swedish Chef
2005-06-30 18:56:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Ewing
I still remember my cat trying to grab something that looked like a
buzzard :-)
We had one that went after a woodpecker, whilst it was pecking... managed
ot stun it into silence : )
--
---
Swedish Chef
The only thing I know, is that I don't know
Werehatrack
2005-06-24 01:36:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by mcv
Post by Clare
However, I have noticed a worrying habit that one of them has. I don't
know which because it happened while I was out, but someone feline has
been eating the cotton ends - plastic and all - off some cotton buds!
Needless to say I was concerned for a while and removed the cotton buds
out of feline reach, but so far no ill effects have presented
themselves....
Has anyone else had this sort of thing happen?
Bits of plastic bags are a popular snack around here. Especially if it's
a kind of plastic that makes noise when you touch it.
Ours chew on the ends of the rolls of packing tape in the dispensers
that I use when shipping things off.
--
Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
Some gardening required to reply via email.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
Midgardette
2005-06-25 03:58:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Werehatrack
Post by mcv
Bits of plastic bags are a popular snack around here. Especially if it's
a kind of plastic that makes noise when you touch it.
Ours chew on the ends of the rolls of packing tape in the dispensers
that I use when shipping things off.
You're lucky. Our two Siamese darlings open drawers and carry off rolled
socks. I think it reminds them of kittens. The socks end up all over...with
holes chewed in them of course. Oh, and only the black dress socks not the
white sports ones. You have to have standards.
mcv
2005-06-27 14:13:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Midgardette
Post by Werehatrack
Post by mcv
Bits of plastic bags are a popular snack around here. Especially if it's
a kind of plastic that makes noise when you touch it.
Ours chew on the ends of the rolls of packing tape in the dispensers
that I use when shipping things off.
You're lucky. Our two Siamese darlings open drawers and carry off rolled
socks. I think it reminds them of kittens. The socks end up all over...with
holes chewed in them of course. Oh, and only the black dress socks not the
white sports ones. You have to have standards.
My cat is a bit more civilised than that. He likes to drink tea.
From a teapot. (Cold, though.) Water, on the other hand, he prefers
directly from the tap. I suspect he wants to look like me.


mcv.
Midgardette
2005-06-28 02:08:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
Post by Werehatrack
Post by mcv
Bits of plastic bags are a popular snack around here. Especially if it's
a kind of plastic that makes noise when you touch it.
Ours chew on the ends of the rolls of packing tape in the dispensers
that I use when shipping things off.
You're lucky. Our two Siamese darlings open drawers and carry off rolled
socks. I think it reminds them of kittens. The socks end up all over...with
holes chewed in them of course. Oh, and only the black dress socks not the
white sports ones. You have to have standards.
My cat is a bit more civilised than that. He likes to drink tea.
From a teapot. (Cold, though.) Water, on the other hand, he prefers
directly from the tap. I suspect he wants to look like me.
mcv.
Wouldn't it be more civilized to teach him to use a teacup (with extended
pinkie of course)? Any old moggie can use a saucer but a china cup says so
much more about one's deportment. Remember Teach's admonitions?

Midgardette
mcv
2005-06-28 13:48:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
Post by Werehatrack
Post by mcv
Bits of plastic bags are a popular snack around here. Especially if it's
a kind of plastic that makes noise when you touch it.
Ours chew on the ends of the rolls of packing tape in the dispensers
that I use when shipping things off.
You're lucky. Our two Siamese darlings open drawers and carry off rolled
socks. I think it reminds them of kittens. The socks end up all over...with
holes chewed in them of course. Oh, and only the black dress socks not the
white sports ones. You have to have standards.
My cat is a bit more civilised than that. He likes to drink tea.
From a teapot. (Cold, though.) Water, on the other hand, he prefers
directly from the tap. I suspect he wants to look like me.
Wouldn't it be more civilized to teach him to use a teacup (with extended
pinkie of course)? Any old moggie can use a saucer but a china cup says so
much more about one's deportment. Remember Teach's admonitions?
He only drinks from saucers if he's really thirsty or if it's milk.
In the past I've also given him water in a glass to get him to drink
the stuff.

I'll see if I have a tea cup somewhere (I always drink from a mug),
although I'd still have to pour it for him. And actually the tea is
meant for me, not him. The problem is that sometimes I don't finish
a pot completely, and as soon as I'm doing something else, he starts
spooning the tea up with his paw.


mcv.
Laura Melton
2005-06-28 23:48:33 UTC
Permalink
[cat drinking out of teapot]
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
Wouldn't it be more civilized to teach him to use a teacup (with extended
pinkie of course)? Any old moggie can use a saucer but a china cup says so
much more about one's deportment. Remember Teach's admonitions?
He only drinks from saucers if he's really thirsty or if it's milk.
In the past I've also given him water in a glass to get him to drink
the stuff.
I'll see if I have a tea cup somewhere (I always drink from a mug),
although I'd still have to pour it for him. And actually the tea is
meant for me, not him. The problem is that sometimes I don't finish
a pot completely, and as soon as I'm doing something else, he starts
spooning the tea up with his paw.
The cat I live with [1] does this too. If I have a fresh glass of
water, he'll walk straight over to it and stick his head in. If he
can't reach the water that way (usually because I've drunk it down too
far already), he'll stick his paw in to see how far down the water is.

It would be cute if it weren't so annoying. I have taken to drinking
out of a Nalgene bottle most of the time so that I don't have to protect
a water glass.


Laurabelle

[1] Not my cat, even as much as one may own a cat.
--
ASCII silly question, get a silly ANSI.
Midgardette
2005-06-29 00:10:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
My cat is a bit more civilised than that. He likes to drink tea.
From a teapot. (Cold, though.) Water, on the other hand, he prefers
directly from the tap. I suspect he wants to look like me.
Wouldn't it be more civilized to teach him to use a teacup (with extended
pinkie of course)? Any old moggie can use a saucer but a china cup says so
much more about one's deportment. Remember Teach's admonitions?
He only drinks from saucers if he's really thirsty or if it's milk.
In the past I've also given him water in a glass to get him to drink
the stuff.
I'll see if I have a tea cup somewhere (I always drink from a mug),
although I'd still have to pour it for him. And actually the tea is
meant for me, not him. The problem is that sometimes I don't finish
a pot completely, and as soon as I'm doing something else, he starts
spooning the tea up with his paw.
I know some folks are forced to use a mug, although it offends my
sensibilities (grin). At work I'm required to use a plastic (shudder) mug
with a snap down lid. (Seems computers haven't learned how to swim yet.
Haven't reached the level of Hex)

How on Disc did your cat learn to remove the lid?

Midgardette
)O( The Turtle Moves!
mcv
2005-06-29 09:21:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
My cat is a bit more civilised than that. He likes to drink tea.
From a teapot. (Cold, though.) Water, on the other hand, he prefers
directly from the tap. I suspect he wants to look like me.
Wouldn't it be more civilized to teach him to use a teacup (with extended
pinkie of course)? Any old moggie can use a saucer but a china cup says so
much more about one's deportment. Remember Teach's admonitions?
He only drinks from saucers if he's really thirsty or if it's milk.
In the past I've also given him water in a glass to get him to drink
the stuff.
I'll see if I have a tea cup somewhere (I always drink from a mug),
although I'd still have to pour it for him. And actually the tea is
meant for me, not him. The problem is that sometimes I don't finish
a pot completely, and as soon as I'm doing something else, he starts
spooning the tea up with his paw.
I know some folks are forced to use a mug, although it offends my
sensibilities (grin).
Why? A mug can hold more tea, which is good.
Post by Midgardette
At work I'm required to use a plastic (shudder) mug
with a snap down lid. (Seems computers haven't learned how to swim yet.
Haven't reached the level of Hex)
Plastic is bad. Computers are safe from tea if you learn not to knock
is over.
Post by Midgardette
How on Disc did your cat learn to remove the lid?
I don't use lids. I always use or misplace them. Besides, they're
plastic, which is technically bad.


mcv.
Midgardette
2005-06-30 01:39:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
He only drinks from saucers if he's really thirsty or if it's milk.
In the past I've also given him water in a glass to get him to drink
the stuff.
I'll see if I have a tea cup somewhere (I always drink from a mug),
although I'd still have to pour it for him. And actually the tea is
meant for me, not him. The problem is that sometimes I don't finish
a pot completely, and as soon as I'm doing something else, he starts
spooning the tea up with his paw.
I know some folks are forced to use a mug, although it offends my
sensibilities (grin).
Why? A mug can hold more tea, which is good.
The teapot is used for holding the tea. One uses the cup to drink from.
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
At work I'm required to use a plastic (shudder) mug
with a snap down lid. (Seems computers haven't learned how to swim yet.
Haven't reached the level of Hex)
Plastic is bad. Computers are safe from tea if you learn not to knock
is over.
Ahh there's the rub. Seems my cow-orkers haven't yet learned this and I'm
forced to abide by rules based on their limitations.
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
How on Disc did your cat learn to remove the lid?
I don't use lids. I always use or misplace them. Besides, they're
plastic, which is technically bad.
I see. Which side are you on in the china versus metal issue?

Midgardette
)O( The Turtle Moves
mcv
2005-06-30 14:10:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
He only drinks from saucers if he's really thirsty or if it's milk.
In the past I've also given him water in a glass to get him to drink
the stuff.
I'll see if I have a tea cup somewhere (I always drink from a mug),
although I'd still have to pour it for him. And actually the tea is
meant for me, not him. The problem is that sometimes I don't finish
a pot completely, and as soon as I'm doing something else, he starts
spooning the tea up with his paw.
I know some folks are forced to use a mug, although it offends my
sensibilities (grin).
Why? A mug can hold more tea, which is good.
The teapot is used for holding the tea. One uses the cup to drink from.
You can drink more from a mug.
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
How on Disc did your cat learn to remove the lid?
I don't use lids. I always use or misplace them. Besides, they're
plastic, which is technically bad.
I see. Which side are you on in the china versus metal issue?
My pots are glass, which is cheap and good and certainly better than
metal.


mcv.
Arthur Hagen
2005-06-30 17:44:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by mcv
My pots are glass, which is cheap and good and certainly better than
metal.
I read that as "grass" at first. Which made sense, for a different kind
of pot :-)

Regards,
--
*Art
Midgardette
2005-07-01 01:54:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
I know some folks are forced to use a mug, although it offends my
sensibilities (grin).
Why? A mug can hold more tea, which is good.
The teapot is used for holding the tea. One uses the cup to drink from.
You can drink more from a mug.
Can't argue with that. More is good. (^:"
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
How on Disc did your cat learn to remove the lid?
I don't use lids. I always use or misplace them. Besides, they're
plastic, which is technically bad.
I see. Which side are you on in the china versus metal issue?
My pots are glass, which is cheap and good and certainly better than
metal.
Same here, although my girlfriend, from Liverpool, swears by her aluminium
teapot. I've never been able to tell the difference between milk first and
milk after either.
Post by mcv
mcv.
Pardon me, but are you the same mcv who has art work on the L-space site?

Midgardette
The Turtle Moved...and I lost my place.
Flesh-eating Dragon
2005-07-01 10:26:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Midgardette
Same here, although my girlfriend, from Liverpool, swears by her aluminium
teapot. I've never been able to tell the difference between milk first and
milk after either.
The difference is that if you put the milk in after you can tell how
*much* milk you have actually put in (by the colour).

Adrian.
Arthur Hagen
2005-07-01 12:32:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Midgardette
Same here, although my girlfriend, from Liverpool, swears by her
aluminium teapot. I've never been able to tell the difference
between milk first and milk after either.
The difference is that if you put the milk in after you can tell how
*much* milk you have actually put in (by the colour).
I believe you're exactly wrong. Since you don't see the actual milk,
you can't judge how *much* milk you've put in -- how can you tell
whether it's 4cc or 6cc? If you pour it in the cup first, you can
easier estimate how much milk you've put in (though it makes it harder
to estimate how much *tea* you've put in.)

However, that's not all that important, as it's usually the *ratio* of
milk to tea that matters, and not how *much* milk. Unless you're on a
very strict diet.

As for the colour, the colour changes just as much whether you pour milk
in tea or tea in milk. If anything, there's less need for stirring if
you pour the milk in first. If you pour the milk in last, the milk
often goes straight down and mixes with tea at the middle of the cup
instead of what's on the surface. So you may think you've put in less
milk than what you actually have.

What matters to me is that the pot *and* cup should be pre-heated, the
milk should not be fridge cold, and it should be a cup, not a mug.
Serving people luke warm tea is an insult.

If you have guests, additional rules apply:
- Don't let any bag tags hang out of the tea pot. At least keep the
*illusion* that you actually made tea.
- Don't ask people whether they want tea and then serve them herbal tea
(i.e. anything not made with real tea leaves). It's like asking people
whether they want a drink, and then serve them carrot juice. While it
technically qualifies, it's a "no".
- Do not place biscuits on the saucer. Dirty an extra plate.

To Americans:
- There's no such thing as a tea mug.
- Dessert spoons are not tea spoons.
- Lumps of white sugar *can* be found at the grocery store.
- Real milk, however, can *not*. Either get ultra-pasteurized milk
without the usual additives or substitute it with light coffee cream or
half-and-half. Just let people know.
- Tea cups, like all other drinking vessels should be placed to the
*right* of the plate.
- Remember that what you call a biscuit, the rest of the world calls a
scone.
- Polite guests won't ask when they want more, and won't help
themselves even if you tell them to beforehand. You have to ask them,
or send the tray around whenever you see someone is out of something.

Regards,
--
*Art
Ingvar
2005-07-01 12:59:30 UTC
Permalink
"Arthur Hagen" <***@broomstick.com> writes:

[ SNIP ]
Post by Arthur Hagen
- There's no such thing as a tea mug.
No, my yellow half-litre cups are cups, not mugs.

They're absolutely perfect in size for a nice warming cuppa of lapsang
souchong (often, but not always, superior), gunpowder or kokei-cha.

Anything less and you need to refill too often. 3-4 cups see you wake
up in the morning, it does.

//Ingvar (safety notice: never *ever* mix kokei-cha and lapsang)
--
Q: What do you call a Discworld admin?
A: Chelonius Monk
Bigjobs
2005-07-01 13:17:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arthur Hagen
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Midgardette
Same here, although my girlfriend, from Liverpool, swears by her
aluminium teapot. I've never been able to tell the difference
between milk first and milk after either.
The difference is that if you put the milk in after you can tell how
*much* milk you have actually put in (by the colour).
I believe you're exactly wrong. Since you don't see the actual milk,
you can't judge how *much* milk you've put in -- how can you tell
whether it's 4cc or 6cc? If you pour it in the cup first, you can
easier estimate how much milk you've put in (though it makes it harder
to estimate how much *tea* you've put in.)
However, that's not all that important, as it's usually the *ratio* of
milk to tea that matters, and not how *much* milk. Unless you're on a
very strict diet.
As for the colour, the colour changes just as much whether you pour milk
in tea or tea in milk. If anything, there's less need for stirring if
you pour the milk in first. If you pour the milk in last, the milk
often goes straight down and mixes with tea at the middle of the cup
instead of what's on the surface. So you may think you've put in less
milk than what you actually have.
What matters to me is that the pot *and* cup should be pre-heated, the
milk should not be fridge cold, and it should be a cup, not a mug.
Serving people luke warm tea is an insult.
- Don't let any bag tags hang out of the tea pot. At least keep the
*illusion* that you actually made tea.
- Don't ask people whether they want tea and then serve them herbal tea
(i.e. anything not made with real tea leaves). It's like asking people
whether they want a drink, and then serve them carrot juice. While it
technically qualifies, it's a "no".
- Do not place biscuits on the saucer. Dirty an extra plate.
- There's no such thing as a tea mug.
- Dessert spoons are not tea spoons.
- Lumps of white sugar *can* be found at the grocery store.
- Real milk, however, can *not*. Either get ultra-pasteurized milk
without the usual additives or substitute it with light coffee cream or
half-and-half. Just let people know.
- Tea cups, like all other drinking vessels should be placed to the
*right* of the plate.
- Remember that what you call a biscuit, the rest of the world calls a
scone.
- Polite guests won't ask when they want more, and won't help
themselves even if you tell them to beforehand. You have to ask them,
or send the tray around whenever you see someone is out of something.
I'm coming round for a cup of tea sometime arthur.

No milk, half a sugar please.
--
Bigjobs
Arthur Hagen
2005-07-02 18:40:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bigjobs
I'm coming round for a cup of tea sometime arthur.
No milk, half a sugar please.
One heffalump tea coming up!
--
*Art
Midgardette
2005-07-02 22:27:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arthur Hagen
Post by Bigjobs
I'm coming round for a cup of tea sometime arthur.
No milk, half a sugar please.
One heffalump tea coming up!
--
*Art
tea he he he he
Flesh-eating Dragon
2005-07-01 13:54:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arthur Hagen
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Midgardette
Same here, although my girlfriend, from Liverpool, swears by her
aluminium teapot. I've never been able to tell the difference
between milk first and milk after either.
The difference is that if you put the milk in after you can tell how
*much* milk you have actually put in (by the colour).
I believe you're exactly wrong. Since you don't see the actual milk,
you can't judge how *much* milk you've put in -- how can you tell
whether it's 4cc or 6cc?
By knowing how much you put in, I mean knowing that you've put the
same amount in this time as you have on previous occasions (relative
to the other ingredients). I don't actually mean being able to name
the quantity.

It's true that you *can* put a precise, measured amount of milk in to
begin with, but it's not worth the effort. Out of tea (or coffee, for
that matter), water and milk, the third is the hardest item to control
how much you put in. Therefore, optimal control is achieved by putting
the water/tea in first, and then adding the milk until the mixture has
the desired appearance. I don't like to put the milk in first and then
add the other ingredients to achieve the desired appearance, because
if I get the milk wrong to begin with then the result will not fill
the mug elegantly.

A mug is a type of cup. If you drink tea/coffee out of a mug - as
wise and sensible people do - then you *are* in fact enjoying a cup of
the liquid, except that you are enjoying *more* of it than less wise
and sensible people who drink from a different, smaller type of cup,
which is not a mug. :-)

Adrian.
Len Oil
2005-07-02 10:50:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
A mug is a type of cup. If you drink tea/coffee out of a mug - as
wise and sensible people do - then you *are* in fact enjoying a cup of
the liquid, except that you are enjoying *more* of it than less wise
and sensible people who drink from a different, smaller type of cup,
which is not a mug. :-)
Topologically, they're all donuts... ;)
mcv
2005-07-02 17:59:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Len Oil
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
A mug is a type of cup. If you drink tea/coffee out of a mug - as
wise and sensible people do - then you *are* in fact enjoying a cup of
the liquid, except that you are enjoying *more* of it than less wise
and sensible people who drink from a different, smaller type of cup,
which is not a mug. :-)
Topologically, they're all donuts... ;)
Yet not every donut can hold as much tea as a mug.


mcv.
Arthur Hagen
2005-07-02 18:21:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Len Oil
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
A mug is a type of cup. If you drink tea/coffee out of a mug - as
wise and sensible people do - then you *are* in fact enjoying a cup
of the liquid, except that you are enjoying *more* of it than less
wise and sensible people who drink from a different, smaller type of
cup, which is not a mug. :-)
Topologically, they're all donuts... ;)
Not all of them:

http://www.kleinbottle.com/drinking_mug_klein_bottle.htm

Regards,
--
*Art
Lesley Weston
2005-07-02 18:52:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Len Oil
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
A mug is a type of cup. If you drink tea/coffee out of a mug - as
wise and sensible people do - then you *are* in fact enjoying a cup of
the liquid, except that you are enjoying *more* of it than less wise
and sensible people who drink from a different, smaller type of cup,
which is not a mug. :-)
Topologically, they're all donuts... ;)
As is the person drinking out of them. Kennedy must have known this
important fact when he said "Ich bin ein berliner".
--
Lesley Weston.

Brightly_coloured_blob is real, but I don't often check even the few bits
that get through Yahoo's filters. To reach me, use leswes att shaw dott ca,
changing spelling and spacing as required.
Michael J. Schülke
2005-07-02 21:19:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lesley Weston
As is the person drinking out of them. Kennedy must have known this
important fact when he said "Ich bin ein berliner".
Except that Berliners (the pancakes) aren't donut-shaped.

Michael
mcv
2005-07-01 15:08:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arthur Hagen
However, that's not all that important, as it's usually the *ratio* of
milk to tea that matters, and not how *much* milk. Unless you're on a
very strict diet.
I find all this talk of putting milk in tea rather distasteful. Why
would you possibly want too ruin a perfectly good drink like tea by
putting milk in it?

Tea with milk is fine for kids, but kids also drink sugar with chemicals,
and I wouldn't propose that for adults either.
Post by Arthur Hagen
What matters to me is that the pot *and* cup should be pre-heated, the
milk should not be fridge cold, and it should be a cup, not a mug.
Serving people luke warm tea is an insult.
Mugs are great. They hold more tea, which is good.

I agree that the pot should be pre-heated. The mug doesn't need to be.
The milk should remain in the fridge.
Post by Arthur Hagen
- Don't let any bag tags hang out of the tea pot. At least keep the
*illusion* that you actually made tea.
There's nothing illusionary about making real tea with a bag. It's
true that some of the very best teas don't come in bags, but that
doesn't automatically make every bagless tea superior.
Post by Arthur Hagen
- Don't ask people whether they want tea and then serve them herbal tea
(i.e. anything not made with real tea leaves). It's like asking people
whether they want a drink, and then serve them carrot juice. While it
technically qualifies, it's a "no".
Completely agreed here. Also, don't serve tea that tastes like fruit
unless the guest has explicitly said he likes that sort of stuff.
Post by Arthur Hagen
- Do not place biscuits on the saucer. Dirty an extra plate.
Agreed. In fact, don't bother with saucers at all. As long as you don't
suffer from Parkinson's, a coaster is all you need.
Post by Arthur Hagen
- Lumps of white sugar *can* be found at the grocery store.
And should be left there. Tea should be drunken pure and without
additives. Except for children or people not used to proper tea.
Post by Arthur Hagen
- Real milk, however, can *not*. Either get ultra-pasteurized milk
without the usual additives or substitute it with light coffee cream or
half-and-half. Just let people know.
See above. No additives in tea. Certainly not milk. Except for
children.
Post by Arthur Hagen
- Tea cups, like all other drinking vessels should be placed to the
*right* of the plate.
Except if the person is left-handed, ofcourse. No need to discriminate
against lefties, en it would not be proper if someone accidentally
drunk the tea of the person to the left of him.
Post by Arthur Hagen
- Remember that what you call a biscuit, the rest of the world calls a
scone.
Biscuit, scone, as long as there's cookies.
Post by Arthur Hagen
- Polite guests won't ask when they want more, and won't help
themselves even if you tell them to beforehand. You have to ask them,
or send the tray around whenever you see someone is out of something.
Polite hosts offer more, but polite guests will ask if the host forgets.


mcv.
Stacie Hanes
2005-07-01 15:33:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by mcv
Post by Arthur Hagen
However, that's not all that important, as it's usually the *ratio*
of milk to tea that matters, and not how *much* milk. Unless you're
on a very strict diet.
I find all this talk of putting milk in tea rather distasteful. Why
would you possibly want too ruin a perfectly good drink like tea by
putting milk in it?
I have also saved the dissenting views for later use.
--
Stacie, fourth swordswoman of the afpocalypse.
AFPMinister of Flexible Weapons & Bondage-happy predator
AFPMistress to peachy ashie passion & AFPDeliciousSnack to 8'FED
"If you can't be a good example, you'll just have to be a horrible
warning." Catherine Aird, _His Burial Too_
http://esmeraldus.blogspot.com/
Ingvar
2005-07-01 15:47:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stacie Hanes
Post by mcv
Post by Arthur Hagen
However, that's not all that important, as it's usually the *ratio*
of milk to tea that matters, and not how *much* milk. Unless you're
on a very strict diet.
I find all this talk of putting milk in tea rather distasteful. Why
would you possibly want too ruin a perfectly good drink like tea by
putting milk in it?
I have also saved the dissenting views for later use.
I think this is the time where I go "Uh, oh, am I dissenting or not? I
better not mention milk!".

//Ingvar
--
When the SysAdmin answers the phone politely, say "sorry", hang up and
run awaaaaay!
Informal advice to users at Karolinska Institutet, 1993-1994
Stacie Hanes
2005-07-01 15:55:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ingvar
Post by Stacie Hanes
Post by mcv
Post by Arthur Hagen
However, that's not all that important, as it's usually the *ratio*
of milk to tea that matters, and not how *much* milk. Unless
you're on a very strict diet.
I find all this talk of putting milk in tea rather distasteful. Why
would you possibly want too ruin a perfectly good drink like tea by
putting milk in it?
I have also saved the dissenting views for later use.
I think this is the time where I go "Uh, oh, am I dissenting or not? I
better not mention milk!".
Hey, now, I didn't weigh in on one side or the other. I just thought the
whole thing was interesting. I sometimes have milke in my tea, but more
usually without, since I tend to drink semi-exotic stuff like Dragon Well
and Silver Needle. When I have a stronger black tea, I sometimes add milk
and sugar.
--
Stacie, fourth swordswoman of the afpocalypse.
AFPMinister of Flexible Weapons & Bondage-happy predator
AFPMistress to peachy ashie passion & AFPDeliciousSnack to 8'FED
"If you can't be a good example, you'll just have to be a horrible
warning." Catherine Aird, _His Burial Too_
http://esmeraldus.blogspot.com/
Ingvar
2005-07-01 16:19:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stacie Hanes
Post by Ingvar
Post by Stacie Hanes
Post by mcv
Post by Arthur Hagen
However, that's not all that important, as it's usually the *ratio*
of milk to tea that matters, and not how *much* milk. Unless
you're on a very strict diet.
I find all this talk of putting milk in tea rather distasteful. Why
would you possibly want too ruin a perfectly good drink like tea by
putting milk in it?
I have also saved the dissenting views for later use.
I think this is the time where I go "Uh, oh, am I dissenting or not? I
better not mention milk!".
Hey, now, I didn't weigh in on one side or the other. I just thought the
whole thing was interesting. I sometimes have milke in my tea, but more
usually without, since I tend to drink semi-exotic stuff like Dragon Well
and Silver Needle. When I have a stronger black tea, I sometimes add milk
and sugar.
I seldom have sugar in tea. In fact, I have sugar in my tea just about
as often as I have milk (and that's when I drink Masala Chai; heat
milk, add cardamom seeds and possibly some other spices; drop in
loose-leaf black tea and a shockload of sugar; let this infuse for a
while and strain). Mostly because neither sugar nor milk work well
with soked teas or green teas and taht's (mostly) what I drink,
tea-wise.

Ah,m yes, I'm also lactose-intolerant, so I don't (normally) consider
milk as food, but rather as antifood.

//Ingvar
--
A routing decision is made at every routing point, making local hacks
hard to permeate the network with.
Graycat
2005-07-01 20:09:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by mcv
Post by Arthur Hagen
However, that's not all that important, as it's usually the *ratio* of
milk to tea that matters, and not how *much* milk. Unless you're on a
very strict diet.
I find all this talk of putting milk in tea rather distasteful. Why
would you possibly want too ruin a perfectly good drink like tea by
putting milk in it?
Because it cools the tea so you can drink it without waiting
all afternoon for it to cool by itself.
--
Elin
The Tale of Westala and Villtin
http://tale.cunobaros.com/
The Oswalds DW casting award - Vote Now!
http://www.student.lu.se/~his02ero/Oswald/index.html
mcv
2005-07-01 21:25:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Graycat
Post by mcv
Post by Arthur Hagen
However, that's not all that important, as it's usually the *ratio* of
milk to tea that matters, and not how *much* milk. Unless you're on a
very strict diet.
I find all this talk of putting milk in tea rather distasteful. Why
would you possibly want too ruin a perfectly good drink like tea by
putting milk in it?
Because it cools the tea so you can drink it without waiting
all afternoon for it to cool by itself.
Never heard of patience?

If you're really in that much of a hurry, I suppose using a small
cup is acceptable. It will cool a lot faster that way.


mcv.
Graycat
2005-07-02 21:54:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by mcv
Post by Graycat
Post by mcv
Post by Arthur Hagen
However, that's not all that important, as it's usually the *ratio* of
milk to tea that matters, and not how *much* milk. Unless you're on a
very strict diet.
I find all this talk of putting milk in tea rather distasteful. Why
would you possibly want too ruin a perfectly good drink like tea by
putting milk in it?
Because it cools the tea so you can drink it without waiting
all afternoon for it to cool by itself.
Never heard of patience?
Yeah, but tea is not a big deal for me. So I see no point
in making it so that I can enjoy it with great ceremony half
an hour later. I make it so I can enjoy it now, when I've
made it. Also I hardly ever make tea since plain cold
tapwater is what I usually prefer.
--
Elin
The Tale of Westala and Villtin
http://tale.cunobaros.com/
The Oswalds DW casting award - Vote Now!
http://www.student.lu.se/~his02ero/Oswald/index.html
Arthur Hagen
2005-07-02 18:39:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Graycat
Post by mcv
I find all this talk of putting milk in tea rather distasteful. Why
would you possibly want too ruin a perfectly good drink like tea by
putting milk in it?
Because it cools the tea so you can drink it without waiting
all afternoon for it to cool by itself.
That's why you serve tea in a tea cup and not a mug. The tea cup is
designed to give the tea a large surface area compared to the volume,
serving the dual purpose of letting tea lovers inhale the aroma, and
letting occasional drinkers who aren't used to steaming hot beverages
blow on the surface to cool it down.

A mug defeats both purposes.

Regards,
--
*Art
Lesley Weston
2005-07-02 18:46:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by mcv
Post by Arthur Hagen
However, that's not all that important, as it's usually the *ratio* of
milk to tea that matters, and not how *much* milk. Unless you're on a
very strict diet.
I find all this talk of putting milk in tea rather distasteful.
That's because you're not English [1]

<snip>
Post by mcv
Post by Arthur Hagen
- Don't ask people whether they want tea and then serve them herbal tea
(i.e. anything not made with real tea leaves). It's like asking people
whether they want a drink, and then serve them carrot juice. While it
technically qualifies, it's a "no".
Completely agreed here. Also, don't serve tea that tastes like fruit
unless the guest has explicitly said he likes that sort of stuff.
Absolutely! Shirley, if a guest is so uncivilised as to ask for such a
thing, the proper response is "I'm sorry, I don't have any."
Post by mcv
Post by Arthur Hagen
- Do not place biscuits on the saucer. Dirty an extra plate.
Agreed. In fact, don't bother with saucers at all. As long as you don't
suffer from Parkinson's, a coaster is all you need.
Philistine! Tea is served in smallish cups made of thin china with saucers
and matching side-plates. But not the really small plates, and you can't use
little cake-forks, either. Alternatively, tea may be served in thick white
pint mugs and accompanied by bacon sarnies. Either method is correct, but
nothing else is.

<snip>
Post by mcv
Post by Arthur Hagen
- Remember that what you call a biscuit, the rest of the world calls a
scone.
Biscuit, scone, as long as there's cookies.
And scones. And cake. And little sandwiches made with Gentlemens' Relish or
cucumber. Or bacon sarnies.

[1] Or from the rest of the UK, but in this context "English" is the proper
word.
--
Lesley Weston.

Brightly_coloured_blob is real, but I don't often check even the few bits
that get through Yahoo's filters. To reach me, use leswes att shaw dott ca,
changing spelling and spacing as required.
Brian Wakeling
2005-07-03 00:00:16 UTC
Permalink
In a speech called
<snip>
Post by Lesley Weston
Post by mcv
Post by Arthur Hagen
- Remember that what you call a biscuit, the rest of the
world calls a scone.
Biscuit, scone, as long as there's cookies.
And scones. And cake. And little sandwiches made with
Gentlemens' Relish or cucumber. Or bacon sarnies.
I am really glad you know how to use an apostrophe.
--
Sabremeister Brian :-)
Use b dot wakeling at virgin dot net to reply
http://freespace.virgin.net/b.wakeling/index.html
"Tea is no substitute for potatoes."
- Terry Pratchett 20/8/03
Lister
2005-07-03 07:19:54 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 3 Jul 2005 01:00:16 +0100, "Brian Wakeling"
Post by Brian Wakeling
Post by Lesley Weston
And scones. And cake. And little sandwiches made with
Gentlemens' Relish or cucumber. Or bacon sarnies.
I am really glad you know how to use an apostrophe.
Ahh, that had me confused for a bit there too :)
--
How can I meet Kylie Minogue?
Arthur Hagen
2005-07-02 18:57:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by mcv
Post by Arthur Hagen
- Polite guests won't ask when they want more, and won't help
themselves even if you tell them to beforehand. You have to ask
them, or send the tray around whenever you see someone is out of
something.
Polite hosts offer more, but polite guests will ask if the host forgets.
Um, no. That's exactly wrong. The whole point of being polite is to
not make demands on your host.

If you really want more, a fairly common polite way of /not asking/ is
to take the empty cup or plate and hold it in your hands. Sooner or
later a forgetful host will then wonder why they keep on holding an
empty vessel in their hands, and the light will click on.

If everyone present know the host, you can of course ask. Different
rules for politeness apply then. Also, if you know the host to be rude
or ignorant, there's no shame in asking. And, of course, if you see all
others help themselves from the samovar, there's no point in you not
doing the same. :-)

Regards,
--
*Art
Stacie Hanes
2005-07-01 15:31:04 UTC
Permalink
<snip tea>
Post by Arthur Hagen
- Don't let any bag tags hang out of the tea pot. At least keep the
*illusion* that you actually made tea.
- Don't ask people whether they want tea and then serve them herbal
tea (i.e. anything not made with real tea leaves). It's like asking
people whether they want a drink, and then serve them carrot juice.
While it technically qualifies, it's a "no".
- Do not place biscuits on the saucer. Dirty an extra plate.
<snip>

Art, I saved your entire contribution in case I ever get around to writing
fiction.
--
Stacie, fourth swordswoman of the afpocalypse.
AFPMinister of Flexible Weapons & Bondage-happy predator
AFPMistress to peachy ashie passion & AFPDeliciousSnack to 8'FED
"If you can't be a good example, you'll just have to be a horrible
warning." Catherine Aird, _His Burial Too_
http://esmeraldus.blogspot.com/
Graycat
2005-07-01 20:05:07 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 1 Jul 2005 08:32:15 -0400, "Arthur Hagen"
Post by Arthur Hagen
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Midgardette
Same here, although my girlfriend, from Liverpool, swears by her
aluminium teapot. I've never been able to tell the difference
between milk first and milk after either.
The difference is that if you put the milk in after you can tell how
*much* milk you have actually put in (by the colour).
I believe you're exactly wrong. Since you don't see the actual milk,
you can't judge how *much* milk you've put in -- how can you tell
whether it's 4cc or 6cc? If you pour it in the cup first, you can
easier estimate how much milk you've put in (though it makes it harder
to estimate how much *tea* you've put in.)
However, that's not all that important, as it's usually the *ratio* of
milk to tea that matters, and not how *much* milk. Unless you're on a
very strict diet.
And getting the ration right is easier, I think, if you put
the milk in after. If you put the milk in first, and you put
too much in you can either drink wishy washy tea or pour it
all out and start over. If you put too little you have to
put in more at the end anyway.

If you put the tea in first you can add milk until the
colour is right. If you can't get quite as much milk in as
you'd like, it's not really a problem since the tea is the
point.
--
Elin
The Tale of Westala and Villtin
http://tale.cunobaros.com/
The Oswalds DW casting award - Vote Now!
http://www.student.lu.se/~his02ero/Oswald/index.html
Lesley Weston
2005-07-02 18:30:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Midgardette
Same here, although my girlfriend, from Liverpool, swears by her aluminium
teapot. I've never been able to tell the difference between milk first and
milk after either.
The difference is that if you put the milk in after you can tell how
*much* milk you have actually put in (by the colour).
I thought it was a class thing. Hot tea going into a thick cup without there
being cold milk in there already to cool it down could crack the cup, but
the very finest and thinnest bone china can withstand much higher
temperatures. So those who have such china point out their superiority by
putting the milk in last.
--
Lesley Weston.

Brightly_coloured_blob is real, but I don't often check even the few bits
that get through Yahoo's filters. To reach me, use leswes att shaw dott ca,
changing spelling and spacing as required.
Graycat
2005-07-02 21:47:13 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 02 Jul 2005 18:30:06 GMT, Lesley Weston
Post by Lesley Weston
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Midgardette
Same here, although my girlfriend, from Liverpool, swears by her aluminium
teapot. I've never been able to tell the difference between milk first and
milk after either.
The difference is that if you put the milk in after you can tell how
*much* milk you have actually put in (by the colour).
I thought it was a class thing. Hot tea going into a thick cup without there
being cold milk in there already to cool it down could crack the cup, but
the very finest and thinnest bone china can withstand much higher
temperatures. So those who have such china point out their superiority by
putting the milk in last.
Er, what do you use to make your tea fluid? Alternatively,
what are your mugs made of? I have used only mugs for years
and years and never cracked one by pouring boiling water
into it. It would be a seriously crap mug if it cracked from
boiling water being poured into it.

And besides, wouldn't the best way to avoid something like
that be to heat the mug beforehand? As the combination of
really cold mug and really hot tea, or vice versa, would be
much more likely to crack the mug than hot tea in a hot mug.
--
Elin
The Tale of Westala and Villtin
http://tale.cunobaros.com/
The Oswalds DW casting award - Vote Now!
http://www.student.lu.se/~his02ero/Oswald/index.html
Arthur Hagen
2005-07-02 23:38:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Graycat
On Sat, 02 Jul 2005 18:30:06 GMT, Lesley Weston
Post by Lesley Weston
I thought it was a class thing. Hot tea going into a thick cup
without there being cold milk in there already to cool it down could
crack the cup, but the very finest and thinnest bone china can
withstand much higher temperatures. So those who have such china
point out their superiority by putting the milk in last.
Er, what do you use to make your tea fluid? Alternatively,
what are your mugs made of? I have used only mugs for years
and years and never cracked one by pouring boiling water
into it. It would be a seriously crap mug if it cracked from
boiling water being poured into it.
Your age betrays you. You're probably born after the dishwasher and
heat-resistant cups and mugs became common. You don't have to go
further back than the fifties, and cups and mugs were much more prone to
disintegrating with rapid temperature shifts. Even more so in earlier
days.
Post by Graycat
And besides, wouldn't the best way to avoid something like
that be to heat the mug beforehand? As the combination of
really cold mug and really hot tea, or vice versa, would be
much more likely to crack the mug than hot tea in a hot mug.
Indeed. Except for the problem with the handle, which then breaks off
as it cools down. This is a common problem, especially with older
(pre-dishwasher-safe) coffee/chocolate mugs.

Scorching hot tea in thin bone china is still what I'd prefer. It has
the unique quality that it expands/retracts very little due to
temperature differences, and the thinness further helps in avoiding hot
and cold zones.

Regards,
--
*Art
Alec Cawley
2005-07-02 22:57:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lesley Weston
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Midgardette
Same here, although my girlfriend, from Liverpool, swears by her aluminium
teapot. I've never been able to tell the difference between milk first and
milk after either.
The difference is that if you put the milk in after you can tell how
*much* milk you have actually put in (by the colour).
I thought it was a class thing. Hot tea going into a thick cup without there
being cold milk in there already to cool it down could crack the cup, but
the very finest and thinnest bone china can withstand much higher
temperatures. So those who have such china point out their superiority by
putting the milk in last.
My impression is that then upper class way to do it is to pit the milk
in first, the reason being given that if you add milk to a large
quantity of hot tea, the milk is scalded, whereas if you add tea
relatively slowly to pre-placed milk, it never reaches such a high
temperature, yielding a better flavour.

So far as I can tell the difference, I prefer my milk scalded
(allegedly).
--
@lec ©awley
http://www.livejournal.com/~randombler
mcv
2005-07-01 11:45:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
I know some folks are forced to use a mug, although it offends my
sensibilities (grin).
Why? A mug can hold more tea, which is good.
The teapot is used for holding the tea. One uses the cup to drink from.
You can drink more from a mug.
Can't argue with that. More is good. (^:"
Exactly my point.

I'm actually surprised you're not pointing out that my tea gets cold
without a lid on the pot. Ofcourse answer would have been: only if
you fail to drink it in time.
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
How on Disc did your cat learn to remove the lid?
I don't use lids. I always use or misplace them. Besides, they're
plastic, which is technically bad.
I see. Which side are you on in the china versus metal issue?
My pots are glass, which is cheap and good and certainly better than
metal.
Same here, although my girlfriend, from Liverpool, swears by her aluminium
teapot. I've never been able to tell the difference between milk first and
milk after either.
Who cares about the difference? Both are wrong. Except perhaps for
young children. (Although I have to admit my sister drank her tea
with milk until she was 18.)
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
mcv.
Pardon me, but are you the same mcv who has art work on the L-space site?
Is it a mon^H^H^Hape behind a computer? I made something like that
as a design for an a.f.p t-shirt ages ago, just before disappearing
off the face of the earth.


mcv.
Midgardette
2005-07-02 00:33:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
You can drink more from a mug.
Can't argue with that. More is good. (^:"
Exactly my point.
I'm actually surprised you're not pointing out that my tea gets cold
without a lid on the pot. Ofcourse answer would have been: only if
you fail to drink it in time.
I'm waiting to point out things when I've recovered from the overwhelming
response to my question about milk in tea. I had no idea there were such
vehement feelings. I supposed that the lack of lid was to facilitate the
kitten's quest for tea.
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
Same here, although my girlfriend, from Liverpool, swears by her aluminium
teapot. I've never been able to tell the difference between milk first and
milk after either.
Who cares about the difference? Both are wrong. Except perhaps for
young children. (Although I have to admit my sister drank her tea
with milk until she was 18.)
Some folks advocate a difference in taste depending on teas first or milk
first. I never tasted any difference myself. As for taking milk, I was
brought up that way. I can have it black if I have to. No milk in Chinese
teas though.
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
mcv.
Pardon me, but are you the same mcv who has art work on the L-space site?
Is it a mon^H^H^Hape behind a computer? I made something like that
as a design for an a.f.p t-shirt ages ago, just before disappearing
off the face of the earth.
Yes, I believe it to be the Librarian manipulating Hex. Disappearing? You
don't seem disappeared to me.

Midgardette
The Turtle Moves!
mcv
2005-07-02 10:12:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
You can drink more from a mug.
Can't argue with that. More is good. (^:"
Exactly my point.
I'm actually surprised you're not pointing out that my tea gets cold
without a lid on the pot. Ofcourse answer would have been: only if
you fail to drink it in time.
I'm waiting to point out things when I've recovered from the overwhelming
response to my question about milk in tea. I had no idea there were such
vehement feelings. I supposed that the lack of lid was to facilitate the
kitten's quest for tea.
I'm not facilitating his quest for tea, I'm just too lazy to bother
with lids, and it's probably vanished completely anyway. I think I
should learn to bother with lids, even if only to stop my cat from
messing with my tea.
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
Same here, although my girlfriend, from Liverpool, swears by her aluminium
teapot. I've never been able to tell the difference between milk first and
milk after either.
Who cares about the difference? Both are wrong. Except perhaps for
young children. (Although I have to admit my sister drank her tea
with milk until she was 18.)
Some folks advocate a difference in taste depending on teas first or milk
first. I never tasted any difference myself. As for taking milk, I was
brought up that way. I can have it black if I have to. No milk in Chinese
teas though.
I don't understand why milky tea is so popular in England at all. And
certainly not why they claim it's somehow the right way to drink tea.
To me, milky tea is like ice tea, herbal tea and fruit tea, in that it
is vaguely related to tea, but it's actually totally different drink
altogether.
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
Post by mcv
mcv.
Pardon me, but are you the same mcv who has art work on the L-space site?
Is it a mon^H^H^Hape behind a computer? I made something like that
as a design for an a.f.p t-shirt ages ago, just before disappearing
off the face of the earth.
Yes, I believe it to be the Librarian manipulating Hex.
It was from before Hex first appearance, I think. It was just meant to
be a funny picture of the librarian behind a computer with cogs and imps
(like Rincewind's camera in TCoM), referring to the computerised nature
of a.f.p., since computers and internet were still something special
and not the dirt common household appliances that they are today.

I also had an idea for Death whose keyboard was always had caps lock
on, and Rincewind whose computer could run only one program, but I
never got around to drawing them.
Post by Midgardette
Disappearing? You don't seem disappeared to me.
I keep coming back every now and then.


mcv.
Midgardette
2005-07-02 22:44:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by mcv
Post by mcv
I'm actually surprised you're not pointing out that my tea gets cold
Post by mcv
without a lid on the pot. Ofcourse answer would have been: only if
you fail to drink it in time.
I'm waiting to point out things when I've recovered from the overwhelming
response to my question about milk in tea. I had no idea there were such
vehement feelings. I supposed that the lack of lid was to facilitate the
kitten's quest for tea.
I'm not facilitating his quest for tea, I'm just too lazy to bother
with lids, and it's probably vanished completely anyway. I think I
should learn to bother with lids, even if only to stop my cat from
messing with my tea.
You'd only encourage him to learn how to lift off th lid. Cats are highly
motivated when it come to getting their own way.


<snip>
Post by mcv
Post by mcv
Some folks advocate a difference in taste depending on teas first or milk
first. I never tasted any difference myself. As for taking milk, I was
brought up that way. I can have it black if I have to. No milk in Chinese
teas though.
I don't understand why milky tea is so popular in England at all. And
certainly not why they claim it's somehow the right way to drink tea.
To me, milky tea is like ice tea, herbal tea and fruit tea, in that it
is vaguely related to tea, but it's actually totally different drink
altogether.
Well, I'm not in England, I'm in Canada. I have very strong English roots
though. Darn things go down deep and they're all twisted up.

I don't proclaim with milk is the right way, just 'a' way.
Post by mcv
Post by mcv
Post by mcv
Post by Midgardette
mcv.
Pardon me, but are you the same mcv who has art work on the L-space site?
Is it a mon^H^H^Hape behind a computer? I made something like that
as a design for an a.f.p t-shirt ages ago, just before disappearing
off the face of the earth.
Yes, I believe it to be the Librarian manipulating Hex.
It was from before Hex first appearance, I think. It was just meant to
be a funny picture of the librarian behind a computer with cogs and imps
(like Rincewind's camera in TCoM), referring to the computerised nature
of a.f.p., since computers and internet were still something special
and not the dirt common household appliances that they are today.
I see. Intuitive.
Post by mcv
I also had an idea for Death whose keyboard was always had caps lock
on, and Rincewind whose computer could run only one program, but I
never got around to drawing them.
And I suppose Rincewind's program would run very, very fast, eh? (^:"
Post by mcv
Post by mcv
Disappearing? You don't seem disappeared to me.
I keep coming back every now and then.
All righty then. I'll enjoy you whilst you're here.

Midgardette
"...my father is the Emperor of Klatch and my mother is a small tray of
raspberry puddings."
Rgemini
2005-07-01 20:11:08 UTC
Permalink
Midgardette wrote:
<thnip thtuff about tea and milk firtht or latht>

I've been making and drinking tea for well over 40 years and my
considered opinions are as follows:

1) tea bags spoil the taste
2) loose black tea, in a teapot that has been scalded first, made with
freshly boiling water, gives the best result - about 2 heaped UKian
teaspoons per average pot
3) milk in first-how much? I don't know, I just put the right amount in
4) big cups or mugs are better than small ones
5) if you keep topping the pot up with freshly boiled water you can get
lots of cups of good tea
6) don't forget to use a teastrainer

However - the best tea I ever tasted was when I worked in a toolmakers
workshop. Forget the pot - they heated a brick in the kiln and dropped
it into a galvanised bucket of water. As it boiled they threw in a
handful of tealeaves. Mugs were dipped in and milk added - in
contradiction of my rule 3 but there was no alternative!

Rgemini
mcv
2005-07-01 21:22:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rgemini
<thnip thtuff about tea and milk firtht or latht>
I've been making and drinking tea for well over 40 years and my
1) tea bags spoil the taste
More than metal, or whatever material you use to contain your loose
tea leaves? You do need some way to remove the leaves again after a
few minutes.
Post by Rgemini
3) milk in first-how much? I don't know, I just put the right amount in
No milk! What a horrible idea!
Post by Rgemini
5) if you keep topping the pot up with freshly boiled water you can get
lots of cups of good tea
You're watering down your tea? Or are you re-using old leaves? Either
way, I strongly disagree.
Post by Rgemini
6) don't forget to use a teastrainer
What the hell is that?

Here are my rules of making the best tea:

Boil water. Just before it boils, use a bit of the water to heat the
pot. Pour the boiling water in the pot, and immediately add the tea.
Immediately. Don't wait half a minute or something. Add the tea in
a removable container, be it a bag or something that you can put
your own loose leaves in. Let it steep for 3 or 4 minutes. Remove tea.
Pour. Drink.

Only add sugar if you didn't follow the above instructions and somehow
managed to ruin the tea, and still insist on drinking tea that's been
steeping for 10 minutes or something. Then remind yourself to use a
timer next time.


mcv.
Brian Wakeling
2005-07-01 21:31:24 UTC
Permalink
<snip>
Post by mcv
Post by Rgemini
6) don't forget to use a teastrainer
What the hell is that?
A very useful device that is basically a bowler hat made for
tea cups. It has a wire mesh crown and a very wide, but solid
metal, brim. You place the brim on top of the cup you are
about to pour from the pot into, with the mesh inside the
actual cup (ie. the bowler hat is upside down). Pour the tea
from the pot, and any loose leaves will be caught by the tea
strainer.
--
Sabremeister Brian :-)
Use b dot wakeling at virgin dot net to reply
http://freespace.virgin.net/b.wakeling/index.html
"He who laughs last thinks slowest"
mcv
2005-07-01 21:59:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stacie Hanes
<snip>
Post by mcv
Post by Rgemini
6) don't forget to use a teastrainer
What the hell is that?
A very useful device that is basically a bowler hat made for
tea cups. It has a wire mesh crown and a very wide, but solid
metal, brim. You place the brim on top of the cup you are
about to pour from the pot into, with the mesh inside the
actual cup (ie. the bowler hat is upside down). Pour the tea
from the pot, and any loose leaves will be caught by the tea
strainer.
Ah, sounds like it's the same thing as the Dutch "theezeefje"
(although that can also be made of plastic). Still, the problem
with filtering the leaves as you pour is that you need to pour
all the tea at once, or else some of the tea will get too strong.
This isn't a problem if you have enough company to empty the pot
right away, but alone or in small company, this doesn't work.


mcv.
Arthur Hagen
2005-07-02 19:13:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stacie Hanes
<snip>
Post by mcv
Post by Rgemini
6) don't forget to use a teastrainer
What the hell is that?
A very useful device that is basically a bowler hat made for
tea cups. It has a wire mesh crown and a very wide, but solid
metal, brim.
Wire mesh? Sacrilege! No matter how well you clean them, they will add
flavour of previous servings, rust and dishwater.
A good tea strainer is solid metal (silver or silver plated preferred)
with holes pierced in it for the tea to drain through.

Using a wire mesh cullender for tea is as bad as using an "eternity
filter" for coffee. *shudder*

Regards,
--
*Art
Stacie Hanes
2005-07-01 22:38:49 UTC
Permalink
mcv wrote:
<tea>
Post by mcv
Boil water. Just before it boils, use a bit of the water to heat the
pot. Pour the boiling water in the pot, and immediately add the tea.
Immediately.
Yes, but you let it boil, as opposed to getting it *just* before it boils?
--
Stacie, fourth swordswoman of the afpocalypse.
AFPMinister of Flexible Weapons & Bondage-happy predator
AFPMistress to peachy ashie passion & AFPDeliciousSnack to 8'FED
"If you can't be a good example, you'll just have to be a horrible
warning." Catherine Aird, _His Burial Too_
http://esmeraldus.blogspot.com/
Eric Jarvis
2005-07-01 23:02:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stacie Hanes
<tea>
Post by mcv
Boil water. Just before it boils, use a bit of the water to heat the
pot. Pour the boiling water in the pot, and immediately add the tea.
Immediately.
Yes, but you let it boil, as opposed to getting it *just* before it boils?
Yep, Just before it boils is for coffee which needs to have well aerated
water to get the flavour out. Boiling the water for coffee makes it taste
sort of flat. With tea you need the higher temperature because it gets the
right flavours out of the tea leaf as fast as possible.

Just about every aspect of brewing a decent cup of tea amounts to a race
against tannin.
--
eric - afprelationships in headers
www.ericjarvis.co.uk
"live fast, die only if strictly necessary"
Eric Jarvis
2005-07-01 22:42:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rgemini
<thnip thtuff about tea and milk firtht or latht>
I've been making and drinking tea for well over 40 years and my
1) tea bags spoil the taste
2) loose black tea, in a teapot that has been scalded first, made with
freshly boiling water, gives the best result - about 2 heaped UKian
teaspoons per average pot
3) milk in first-how much? I don't know, I just put the right amount in
4) big cups or mugs are better than small ones
5) if you keep topping the pot up with freshly boiled water you can get
lots of cups of good tea
6) don't forget to use a teastrainer
A former flatmate of mine studied the brewing of tea for his chemistry
PhD. Another former flat mate is, the last I heard, the most senior woman
anywhere in the tea industry. I work on the basis that they probably know
a little bit about how to make a decent cuppa. My taste buds agree.

You are pretty much spot on in every respect, apart from number 5 which is
just plain wrong.

What happens is that the flavours come out of the tea leaf first, the
tanning starts dissolving into the liquor after three minutes or so. So
the longer you leave the tea infusing the more bitter it will taste, and
from around five minutes all that will happen is there will be more
tannin. So what you get after the first run at the pot will taste
significantly different, and unless you like lots of tannin it will taste
a lot worse. You can ameliorate it a little by adding some more tea leaves
as well as more hot water, but by and large the only reason to attempt to
get more than a single round from a pot is lack of tea.

Tea bags aren't as good as leaf tea in a decent pot. However the pyramid
or round bags really do make a better cup of tea than traditional tea
bags. The reason for this is that you need to get the maximum amount of
flavour infused in the first few minutes before the tannin kicks in. So
the more surface area of the leaves that can be exposed to the water the
better. The best shape container to brew tea in is a sphere since it
allows the tea leaves the maximum chance to move around without being
against the surface of the container or trapped by other yea leaves. For
the purpose of brewing tea a traditional tea pot is close enough to
spherical. Spherical tea bags would be a pain to manufacture and pack.

The darker the tea pot the better, and it's best if it's made of something
that insulates well. So the classic brown china tea pot is still probably
the best thing to use.

There is a measurable chemical difference depending on whether the milk
goes in the cup before or after the tea. However it's purely a matter of
taste which you prefer. Some deviants will always prefer tea with the milk
put in after the tea. No amount of persuasion will get the poor deluded
unfortunates to accept the error of their ways, they just prefer the yea
to taste wrong. People who claim there is no difference simply can't taste
well enough to tell. I have no problem with this so long as they ate
willing to accept that they are just plain wrong and should put the milk
in the cup first even though they can't taste the difference.
--
eric - afprelationships in headers
www.ericjarvis.co.uk
"live fast, die only if strictly necessary"
Midgardette
2005-07-03 03:18:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eric Jarvis
Post by Rgemini
<thnip thtuff about tea and milk firtht or latht>
<snipping more thtuff>
Post by Eric Jarvis
A former flatmate of mine studied the brewing of tea for his chemistry
PhD. Another former flat mate is, the last I heard, the most senior woman
anywhere in the tea industry. I work on the basis that they probably know
a little bit about how to make a decent cuppa. My taste buds agree.
You are pretty much spot on in every respect, apart from number 5 which is
just plain wrong.
What happens is that the flavours come out of the tea leaf first, the
tanning starts dissolving into the liquor after three minutes or so. So
the longer you leave the tea infusing the more bitter it will taste, and
from around five minutes all that will happen is there will be more
tannin. So what you get after the first run at the pot will taste
significantly different, and unless you like lots of tannin it will taste
a lot worse. You can ameliorate it a little by adding some more tea leaves
as well as more hot water, but by and large the only reason to attempt to
get more than a single round from a pot is lack of tea.
Tea bags aren't as good as leaf tea in a decent pot. However the pyramid
or round bags really do make a better cup of tea than traditional tea
bags. The reason for this is that you need to get the maximum amount of
flavour infused in the first few minutes before the tannin kicks in.
So what is with the idea of leaving tea to steep for X number of minutes? I
thought there was some kind of rule. It sounds to me like you're standing
over the pot with a stop watch waiting to pour after 3 minutes.


So
Post by Eric Jarvis
the more surface area of the leaves that can be exposed to the water the
better.
Do you stir?



The best shape container to brew tea in is a sphere since it
Post by Eric Jarvis
allows the tea leaves the maximum chance to move around without being
against the surface of the container or trapped by other yea leaves. For
the purpose of brewing tea a traditional tea pot is close enough to
spherical. Spherical tea bags would be a pain to manufacture and pack.
I believe this can be achieved with a tea ball.
Post by Eric Jarvis
The darker the tea pot the better, and it's best if it's made of something
that insulates well. So the classic brown china tea pot is still probably
the best thing to use.
There is a measurable chemical difference depending on whether the milk
goes in the cup before or after the tea. However it's purely a matter of
taste which you prefer. Some deviants will always prefer tea with the milk
put in after the tea. No amount of persuasion will get the poor deluded
unfortunates to accept the error of their ways, they just prefer the yea
to taste wrong. People who claim there is no difference simply can't taste
well enough to tell. I have no problem with this so long as they ate
willing to accept that they are just plain wrong and should put the milk
in the cup first even though they can't taste the difference.
--
eric - afprelationships in headers
www.ericjarvis.co.uk
"live fast, die only if strictly necessary"
My thanks for the tea-mendous education. You seem to have soaked up the
information from you flatmate. Do you have a favourite brand, blend or
combination of teas?

Midgardette
" The important thing about adventures, thought Mr Bunnsy, was that they
shouldn't be so long as to make you miss mealtimes. "
Werehatrack
2005-06-24 01:32:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Clare
However, I have noticed a worrying habit that one of them has. I don't
know which because it happened while I was out, but someone feline has
been eating the cotton ends - plastic and all - off some cotton buds!
Needless to say I was concerned for a while and removed the cotton buds
out of feline reach, but so far no ill effects have presented
themselves....
Has anyone else had this sort of thing happen?
It's not unusual. Before we banned the cats from the bedroom half of
the house, raids on the supplies of odd small items were frequent, and
the item you mentioned was frequently a target of the activities.
More than once, a trail of them was found scattered across the floor
in the hall, some clearly gnawed, and others just batted about until
thoroughly coated with dust and cat hair.

Sleeping (and such) is much more placid now, with the connecting door
kept shut.
--
Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
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