Discussion:
[I] Swedish Pancake Recipe
(too old to reply)
naomi
2006-03-04 08:41:07 UTC
Permalink
Calling all Swede's (gee you guys are popular atm), I 've misplaced,
lost or eaten my recipie for swedish style pancakes. I have a bid
craving, would you share your recipies with me. I can't remember the
proper name,but they are the type that are thin and you can roll them up.

thankyou.

naomi
Flesh-eating Dragon
2006-03-04 09:46:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by naomi
Calling all Swede's (gee you guys are popular atm), I 've misplaced,
lost or eaten my recipie for swedish style pancakes. I have a bid
craving, would you share your recipies with me. I can't remember the
proper name,but they are the type that are thin and you can roll them up.
Um, except that ALL normal pancakes are thin and can be (and often are)
rolled up.

Adrian.
Sofia
2006-03-04 11:20:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by naomi
Calling all Swede's (gee you guys are popular atm), I 've misplaced,
lost or eaten my recipie for swedish style pancakes. I have a bid
craving, would you share your recipies with me. I can't remember the
proper name,but they are the type that are thin and you can roll them up.
Um, except that ALL normal pancakes are thin and can be (and often are)
rolled up.
Adrian.
I'm not Swedish either, but I just typed out "Swedish Pancakes" on my
Google, and it came up with dozens of different pancake recipes for me,
both sweet, and savoury - the choice is yours!


All the best


Sofie
--
Please visit my deviantART page: http://sofen.deviantart.com/
Lesley Weston
2006-03-04 23:47:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by naomi
Calling all Swede's (gee you guys are popular atm), I 've misplaced,
lost or eaten my recipie for swedish style pancakes. I have a bid
craving, would you share your recipies with me. I can't remember the
proper name,but they are the type that are thin and you can roll them up.
Um, except that ALL normal pancakes are thin and can be (and often are)
rolled up.
Not at all. Those are called crepes in North America, while pancakes are
smaller in diameter and thicker, possibly because the batter is thicker to
begin with. Both are delicious.
--
Lesley Weston.

Brightly_coloured_blob is real, but I don't often check even the few bits
that get through Yahoo's filters. To reach me, use leswes att shaw dott ca,
changing spelling and spacing as required.
Flesh-eating Dragon
2006-03-05 02:03:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lesley Weston
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by naomi
Calling all Swede's (gee you guys are popular atm), I 've misplaced,
lost or eaten my recipie for swedish style pancakes. I have a bid
craving, would you share your recipies with me. I can't remember the
proper name,but they are the type that are thin and you can roll them up.
Um, except that ALL normal pancakes are thin and can be (and often are)
rolled up.
Not at all. Those are called crepes in North America, while pancakes are
smaller in diameter and thicker, possibly because the batter is thicker to
begin with. Both are delicious.
But Naomi's in Australia like me, so it's strange that she should think
of rollable pancakes as Swedish.

Adrian.
Lesley Weston
2006-03-05 17:25:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Lesley Weston
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by naomi
Calling all Swede's (gee you guys are popular atm), I 've misplaced,
lost or eaten my recipie for swedish style pancakes. I have a bid
craving, would you share your recipies with me. I can't remember the
proper name,but they are the type that are thin and you can roll them up.
Um, except that ALL normal pancakes are thin and can be (and often are)
rolled up.
Not at all. Those are called crepes in North America, while pancakes are
smaller in diameter and thicker, possibly because the batter is thicker to
begin with. Both are delicious.
But Naomi's in Australia like me, so it's strange that she should think
of rollable pancakes as Swedish.
Fair enough, though she does, of course, have the right to think of anything
in any way she pleases.
--
Lesley Weston.

Brightly_coloured_blob is real, but I don't often check even the few bits
that get through Yahoo's filters. To reach me, use leswes att shaw dott ca,
changing spelling and spacing as required.
X Kyle M Thompson
2006-03-05 17:55:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Lesley Weston
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by naomi
Calling all Swede's (gee you guys are popular atm), I 've misplaced,
lost or eaten my recipie for swedish style pancakes. I have a bid
craving, would you share your recipies with me. I can't remember the
proper name,but they are the type that are thin and you can roll them up.
Um, except that ALL normal pancakes are thin and can be (and often are)
rolled up.
Not at all. Those are called crepes in North America, while pancakes are
smaller in diameter and thicker, possibly because the batter is thicker to
begin with. Both are delicious.
But Naomi's in Australia like me, so it's strange that she should think
of rollable pancakes as Swedish.
Last year I had pancakes at Perth's Wesley mission (is that a
Baptist thing?) and they were *really* thick, and not very nice.

Had to make my own this year - and very nice they were too, but
the company of a small nurse helped.

kt.
--
So I went down the ice-cream shop, and said 'I want to buy an ice-cream'.
He said 'Hundreds & Thousands?' I said 'We'll start with one.'
Werehatrack
2006-03-05 17:59:05 UTC
Permalink
On 4 Mar 2006 18:03:00 -0800, "Flesh-eating Dragon"
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Lesley Weston
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by naomi
Calling all Swede's (gee you guys are popular atm), I 've misplaced,
lost or eaten my recipie for swedish style pancakes. I have a bid
craving, would you share your recipies with me. I can't remember the
proper name,but they are the type that are thin and you can roll them up.
Um, except that ALL normal pancakes are thin and can be (and often are)
rolled up.
Not at all. Those are called crepes in North America, while pancakes are
smaller in diameter and thicker, possibly because the batter is thicker to
begin with. Both are delicious.
But Naomi's in Australia like me, so it's strange that she should think
of rollable pancakes as Swedish.
While in much of the world, they'd be considered French, or even
(gasp) the local norm.
--
Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
Some gardening required to reply via email.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
X Kyle M Thompson
2006-03-05 17:59:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by naomi
Calling all Swede's (gee you guys are popular atm), I 've misplaced,
lost or eaten my recipie for swedish style pancakes. I have a bid
craving, would you share your recipies with me. I can't remember the
proper name,but they are the type that are thin and you can roll them up.
Um, except that ALL normal pancakes are thin and can be (and often are)
rolled up.
Not at all. Those are called crepes in North America...
Yeabut, you're not normal are you? ;)

I was in St John's, NFLD, pancake day 2001 and went down the
shops to get ingredients (avoiding the 6' snow drifts) and
surprised the shopkeeper by asking for lemons. She had never
heard of sugar and lemon pancakes. The
at-this-point-in-time-most-definitely-not-girlfriend I was
visiting had not heard of them either, but loveld them -
especially the was I made them 'so thin'

kt.
--
So I went down the ice-cream shop, and said 'I want to buy an ice-cream'.
He said 'Hundreds & Thousands?' I said 'We'll start with one.'
Flesh-eating Dragon
2006-03-06 05:42:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by X Kyle M Thompson
So I went down the ice-cream shop, and said 'I want to buy an ice-cream'.
He said 'Hundreds & Thousands?' I said 'We'll start with one.'
I'm told that when we lived in Scotland, the Scottish people around us
thought the idea of fairy bread was completely insane.

For those afpers who don't know, fairy bread is bread and butter
(usually cut into triangles) with hundreds and thousands sprinkled on
top. It's standard fare for children's parties. Apart from Australia,
in which countries is fairy bread popular?

Adrian.
NiceOrc
2006-03-06 11:19:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by X Kyle M Thompson
So I went down the ice-cream shop, and said 'I want to buy an ice-cream'.
He said 'Hundreds & Thousands?' I said 'We'll start with one.'
I'm told that when we lived in Scotland, the Scottish people around us
thought the idea of fairy bread was completely insane.
For those afpers who don't know, fairy bread is bread and butter
(usually cut into triangles) with hundreds and thousands sprinkled on
top. It's standard fare for children's parties. Apart from Australia,
in which countries is fairy bread popular?
Adrian.
Here in New Zealand it's a big part of most children's parties. I even
know a girl who requested it at her 21st!

(Of course I'm obliged to state that NZ made it first and invented 100s
and 1000s and anything Australia produces is but a pale imitation...)

100s and 1000s on pavlova is very good too.
Cheers
Niceorc
Flesh-eating Dragon
2006-03-06 12:14:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by NiceOrc
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
I'm told that when we lived in Scotland, the Scottish people around us
thought the idea of fairy bread was completely insane.
For those afpers who don't know, fairy bread is bread and butter
(usually cut into triangles) with hundreds and thousands sprinkled on
top. It's standard fare for children's parties. Apart from Australia,
in which countries is fairy bread popular?
Here in New Zealand it's a big part of most children's parties. I even
know a girl who requested it at her 21st!
(Of course I'm obliged to state that NZ made it first and invented 100s
and 1000s and anything Australia produces is but a pale imitation...)
100s and 1000s on pavlova is very good too.
My opinion about pavlova is that it's only worth having if it's got
mulberries on it. Mixed berries are good too, so long as they include
mulberries. But forget peach pavlova, forget strawberry pavlova, for
those are abominations and all who eat them are accursed.

Adrian.
Peter Davies
2006-03-06 12:56:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
My opinion about pavlova is that it's only worth having if it's got
mulberries on it. Mixed berries are good too, so long as they include
mulberries. But forget peach pavlova, forget strawberry pavlova, for those
are abominations and all who eat them are accursed.
Ooo! Snob.


..PeterH
Werehatrack
2006-03-05 17:57:40 UTC
Permalink
On 4 Mar 2006 01:46:09 -0800, "Flesh-eating Dragon"
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by naomi
Calling all Swede's (gee you guys are popular atm), I 've misplaced,
lost or eaten my recipie for swedish style pancakes. I have a bid
craving, would you share your recipies with me. I can't remember the
proper name,but they are the type that are thin and you can roll them up.
Um, except that ALL normal pancakes are thin and can be (and often are)
rolled up.
Proper Southern USA pancakes are much too thick to roll up, and
they're definitely the regional norm.
--
Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
Some gardening required to reply via email.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
Orjan Westin
2006-03-04 11:06:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by naomi
Calling all Swede's (gee you guys are popular atm), I 've misplaced,
lost or eaten my recipie for swedish style pancakes. I have a bid
craving, would you share your recipies with me. I can't remember the
proper name,but they are the type that are thin and you can roll them up.
From memory, this is my usual mix:

6dl milk (unskimmed)
3dl white wheat flour
3 eggs
A pinch of salt.

Mix milk and flour, add salt and eggs. Stir. Fry in butter. Best results
from a non-non-stick cast iron frying pan.

Orjan
--
Get your Tale paperback or CD here:
http://tale.cunobaros.com
Or just read it there, if you don't want the illustrations
Flesh-eating Dragon
2006-03-04 12:42:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Orjan Westin
Post by naomi
Calling all Swede's (gee you guys are popular atm), I 've misplaced,
lost or eaten my recipie for swedish style pancakes. I have a bid
craving, would you share your recipies with me. I can't remember the
proper name,but they are the type that are thin and you can roll them
up.
6dl milk (unskimmed)
3dl white wheat flour
3 eggs
A pinch of salt.
Mix milk and flour, add salt and eggs. Stir. Fry in butter. Best results
from a non-non-stick cast iron frying pan.
The impression I get from this thread is that what Naomi calls "swedish
pancakes" are simply, um, *pancakes*. Of the type that are simply
called *pancakes* in Australia and many other countries *anyway*. So
I'm curious as to what her source is for calling them Swedish. After
all, it is undoubtably true that typical Australian pancakes can be -
and frequently are - rolled up.

For reference, below are two Australian pancake recipes. I include two
because, of course, every family has its own variation, so including
more than one helps to indicate the range of variations that are
accepted under the banner of "the normal sort of pancake".

Toppings? Typical choices among Australian consumers include:

(a) Lemon and sugar - in which case the pancake is usually rolled up.
(b) Maple syrup - in which case the pancake is usually rolled up.
(c) Icecream and jam - in which case the pancake is eaten flat, 'cos
you can't roll up icecream.

Adrian.

------------------------------------------
Recipe #1 - this is the one my family uses
------------------------------------------

Solid ingredients:
Equal proportions of plain flour and self-raising flour by volume.

Liquid ingredients:
Egg and milk in the proportion of 2/3 egg to 1/3 milk by volume, using
one egg per person. Also, a small quantity of melted butter.

Mix solid and liquid ingredients together until the consistency is
right. Fry as in Orjan's version.

---------------------------------------------------------
Recipe #2 - this is from my late grandmother's collection
---------------------------------------------------------

1/2 pt milk
4oz (125g) flour
1 egg
1 pinch salt

Sift flour, add salt, add egg whole, stir in flour from sides, add milk
slowly, when 1/2 milk is used all flour must be damp.
Graycat
2006-03-04 13:00:15 UTC
Permalink
On 4 Mar 2006 04:42:21 -0800, "Flesh-eating Dragon"
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
The impression I get from this thread is that what Naomi calls "swedish
pancakes" are simply, um, *pancakes*. Of the type that are simply
called *pancakes* in Australia and many other countries *anyway*. So
I'm curious as to what her source is for calling them Swedish. After
all, it is undoubtably true that typical Australian pancakes can be -
and frequently are - rolled up.
American pancakes have baking powder in them and get a lot
thicker. Also they are smaller an un-rollable. Over there
thin pancakes get called crepes. (iirc)
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
(c) Icecream and jam - in which case the pancake is eaten flat, 'cos
you can't roll up icecream.
Yes, you can. I have done so all my life. Swedish pancakes
are, to the best of my knowledge, always eaten rolled up, no
matter wether you put ice-cream or mushrooms in thick sause
(or anything else [1]) in them.

[1] Though ketchup is apparently not to be recommended.
--
Elin
The Tale of Westala and Villtin
http://tale.cunobaros.com/
The Oswalds DW casting award - Vote Now!
http://www.student.lu.se/~his02ero/Oswald/index.html
Daibhid Ceanaideach
2006-03-04 13:10:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Graycat
On 4 Mar 2006 04:42:21 -0800, "Flesh-eating Dragon"
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
The impression I get from this thread is that what Naomi
calls "swedish pancakes" are simply, um, *pancakes*. Of the
type that are simply called *pancakes* in Australia and
many other countries *anyway*. So I'm curious as to what
her source is for calling them Swedish. After all, it is
undoubtably true that typical Australian pancakes can be -
and frequently are - rolled up.
American pancakes have baking powder in them and get a lot
thicker. Also they are smaller an un-rollable. Over there
thin pancakes get called crepes. (iirc)
In Scotland these are also called pancakes. In the rest of the
UK they're drop scones, or Scotch pancakes.

Sometimes we call them scones as well, and the thin kind of
pancake is *also* called a pancake, to cause confusion.
--
Dave
Official Absentee of EU Skiffeysoc
http://www.eusa.ed.ac.uk/societies/sesoc
"Be reasonable, demand the impossible now" -Robb Johnson
"Run before you walk, fly before you crawl" -Moist von Lipwig
Sofia
2006-03-04 21:32:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Daibhid Ceanaideach
Post by Graycat
American pancakes have baking powder in them and get a lot
thicker. Also they are smaller an un-rollable. Over there
thin pancakes get called crepes. (iirc)
In Scotland these are also called pancakes. In the rest of the
UK they're drop scones, or Scotch pancakes.
Thank god for that! I thought for a minute I'd been making pancakes
wrong all these years, just because I made them really flat, and reserved
my baking powder for my bread to rise! :-)


All the best


Sofie
--
Please visit my deviantART page: http://sofen.deviantart.com/
Lesley Weston
2006-03-05 00:28:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sofia
Post by Daibhid Ceanaideach
Post by Graycat
American pancakes have baking powder in them and get a lot
thicker. Also they are smaller an un-rollable. Over there
thin pancakes get called crepes. (iirc)
In Scotland these are also called pancakes. In the rest of the
UK they're drop scones, or Scotch pancakes.
Thank god for that! I thought for a minute I'd been making pancakes
wrong all these years, just because I made them really flat, and reserved
my baking powder for my bread to rise! :-)
You put baking powder in your bread? Though soda bread can be very nice.
--
Lesley Weston.

Brightly_coloured_blob is real, but I don't often check even the few bits
that get through Yahoo's filters. To reach me, use leswes att shaw dott ca,
changing spelling and spacing as required.
Werehatrack
2006-03-05 18:34:28 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 04 Mar 2006 21:32:16 +0000, Sofia
Post by Sofia
Post by Daibhid Ceanaideach
Post by Graycat
American pancakes have baking powder in them and get a lot
thicker. Also they are smaller an un-rollable. Over there
thin pancakes get called crepes. (iirc)
In Scotland these are also called pancakes. In the rest of the
UK they're drop scones, or Scotch pancakes.
Thank god for that! I thought for a minute I'd been making pancakes
wrong all these years, just because I made them really flat, and reserved
my baking powder for my bread to rise! :-)
And in North America, it's not bread unless there's yeast providing
the lift. Woe betide the neophyte cook who makes a batch of bread
from what's called "self rising flour", which contains baking powder.
(Does this absurdity exist elsewhere? Why do they make such a thing?
Flour should just be *flour*, dammit!)
--
Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
Some gardening required to reply via email.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
Flesh-eating Dragon
2006-03-06 02:51:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Werehatrack
Woe betide the neophyte cook who makes a batch of bread
from what's called "self rising flour", which contains baking powder.
(Does this absurdity exist elsewhere?
No, but self r_a_ising flour does. What's so absurd about it?

Adrian.
Werehatrack
2006-03-05 18:30:44 UTC
Permalink
On 4 Mar 2006 13:10:22 GMT, Daibhid Ceanaideach
Post by Daibhid Ceanaideach
In Scotland these are also called pancakes. In the rest of the
UK they're drop scones, or Scotch pancakes.
Sometimes we call them scones as well, and the thin kind of
pancake is *also* called a pancake, to cause confusion.
I have come to the conclusion that there are certain terms used in
designation of British comestibles that have been chosen specifically
for the purpose of ensuring that visitors from anywhere else will be
unable to predict precisely what they will get when ordering a meal
from a menu in a restaurant. This may be part of the reason that
non-British food is so popular there; at least you have some hope that
(for example) tandoori chicken or falafel or kung pao prawns will be a
dish that has some recognizable correspondence to what you've had
before. Only haggis, of all the British things I've eaten in Britain,
seemed to be reliably predictable everywhere.

I will note that while there are also some notable regional food
terminology variances in the US, they're spread over a much wider
area. Some of them, like the aberrant usage of "mango" in Indiana,
are quite remarkable in their, err, eccentricity. In much of the US,
though, the culinary variances tend to be in the precise choice of
ingredients considered proper in a dish. Things are routinely added
to chili con carne in Ohio that would be grounds for deportation in
New Mexico, for instance.

And then there are the regional dishes whose original constituents are
not always to be found elsewhere, with the result that the end product
may be different (and sometimes improved, though not always).
Louisiana gumbo is an example; best not to inquire what may be in an
*authentic local* gumbo. Elsewhere, the spirit of the gumbo concept
is more often preserved (what you got, it goes in the pot) than the
substance is recreated.

In another example, much of the range of Tex-Mex suffers with distance
from the source; there is nothing so disappointing as an enchilada
topped with melted sharp cheddar, for instance. One staple of Tex-Mex
fare is "refried beans", which do not have to be fried (in the sense
that mose US cooks would expect) in fact; I do not want to know what a
Glasgow chip shop would offer up as its version of that dish.
--
Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
Some gardening required to reply via email.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
Stacie Hanes
2006-03-05 20:42:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Werehatrack
Some of them, like the aberrant usage of "mango" in Indiana
*Please* explain this.
--
Stacie, fourth swordswoman of the afpocalypse.
AFPMinister of Flexible Weapons & Bondage-happy predator
AFPMistress to peachy ashie passion & AFPDeliciousSnack to 8'FED
"If you can't be a good example, you'll just have to be a horrible
warning." Catherine Aird, _His Burial Too_
http://esmeraldus.blogspot.com/
Werehatrack
2006-03-06 01:29:09 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 05 Mar 2006 20:42:24 GMT, "Stacie Hanes"
Post by Stacie Hanes
Post by Werehatrack
Some of them, like the aberrant usage of "mango" in Indiana
*Please* explain this.
In the rest of the English-speaking world, a mango is a tropical
fruit. In Indiana, it's a Bell pepper. I have no idea how this came
to be.
--
Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
Some gardening required to reply via email.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
Stacie Hanes
2006-03-06 01:32:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Werehatrack
On Sun, 05 Mar 2006 20:42:24 GMT, "Stacie Hanes"
Post by Stacie Hanes
Post by Werehatrack
Some of them, like the aberrant usage of "mango" in Indiana
*Please* explain this.
In the rest of the English-speaking world, a mango is a tropical
fruit. In Indiana, it's a Bell pepper. I have no idea how this
came to be.
That's just *bizarre*.
--
Stacie, fourth swordswoman of the afpocalypse.
AFPMinister of Flexible Weapons & Bondage-happy predator
AFPMistress to peachy ashie passion & AFPDeliciousSnack to 8'FED
"If you can't be a good example, you'll just have to be a horrible
warning." Catherine Aird, _His Burial Too_
http://esmeraldus.blogspot.com/
Kimberley Verburg
2006-03-06 14:04:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Werehatrack
In the rest of the English-speaking world, a mango is a tropical
fruit. In Indiana, it's a Bell pepper. I have no idea how this came
to be.
Do they call all bell peppers[1] that or just the yellow ones?

[1] What NZers call capsicums, btw. *g*
--
Kimberley Verburg
***@lspace.org
Flesh-eating Dragon
2006-03-06 14:40:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kimberley Verburg
Post by Werehatrack
In the rest of the English-speaking world, a mango is a tropical
fruit. In Indiana, it's a Bell pepper. I have no idea how this came
to be.
Do they call all bell peppers[1] that or just the yellow ones?
[1] What NZers call capsicums, btw. *g*
And Australians. Among, I'm quite sure, others.

Exercise to the reader: What do I mean?

(a) that NZers call "peppers" capsicums or Australians.
(b) that NZers call Australians and "peppers" capsicums.
(c) that NZers and Australians call "peppers" capsicums.

Answers to be sculpted in runny pancake batter and submitted by post.

Adrian.
John Ewing
2006-03-06 01:18:06 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 05 Mar 2006 18:30:44 GMT, Werehatrack
<***@earthWEEDSlink.net> wrote:

[snip]
Post by Werehatrack
Only haggis, of all the British things I've eaten in Britain,
seemed to be reliably predictable everywhere.
Depends where it's caught :-)
Post by Werehatrack
One staple of Tex-Mex
fare is "refried beans", which do not have to be fried (in the sense
that mose US cooks would expect) in fact; I do not want to know what a
Glasgow chip shop would offer up as its version of that dish.
I don't think there is an equivalent - yet...

John
--
John Ewing
Glaschu / Glasgow
Alba / Scotland
jester
2006-03-06 11:21:30 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 05 Mar 2006 18:30:44 GMT, Werehatrack
<***@earthWEEDSlink.net> wrote:
<snip>
Post by Werehatrack
In another example, much of the range of Tex-Mex suffers with distance
from the source; there is nothing so disappointing as an enchilada
topped with melted sharp cheddar, for instance. One staple of Tex-Mex
fare is "refried beans", which do not have to be fried (in the sense
that mose US cooks would expect) in fact; I do not want to know what a
Glasgow chip shop would offer up as its version of that dish.
I think the answer to that question is always "Deep fried", so in this
case we have deep-fried refried beans.
--
Andy Brown
Don't use a big word where a diminutive one will suffice.
Flesh-eating Dragon
2006-03-04 13:36:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Graycat
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
The impression I get from this thread is that what Naomi calls "swedish
pancakes" are simply, um, *pancakes*. Of the type that are simply
called *pancakes* in Australia and many other countries *anyway*. So
I'm curious as to what her source is for calling them Swedish. After
all, it is undoubtably true that typical Australian pancakes can be -
and frequently are - rolled up.
American pancakes have baking powder in them and get a lot
thicker. Also they are smaller an un-rollable. Over there
thin pancakes get called crepes. (iirc)
Do Americans have pikelets? (i.e. like pancakes, but smaller, thicker,
and sweeter)
Post by Graycat
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
(c) Icecream and jam - in which case the pancake is eaten flat, 'cos
you can't roll up icecream.
Yes, you can. I have done so all my life. Swedish pancakes
are, to the best of my knowledge, always eaten rolled up, no
matter wether you put ice-cream or mushrooms in thick sause
(or anything else [1]) in them.
So in other words:

Always Often Not
Rolled Rolled Rolled
Up Up Up
| | |
+------------------------+------------------------------------+
| | |
Sweden Australia America

Savoury pancakes are very unusual here.

Adrian.
Graycat
2006-03-04 14:24:54 UTC
Permalink
On 4 Mar 2006 05:36:45 -0800, "Flesh-eating Dragon"
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Graycat
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
(c) Icecream and jam - in which case the pancake is eaten flat, 'cos
you can't roll up icecream.
Yes, you can. I have done so all my life. Swedish pancakes
are, to the best of my knowledge, always eaten rolled up, no
matter wether you put ice-cream or mushrooms in thick sause
(or anything else [1]) in them.
Always Often Not
Rolled Rolled Rolled
Up Up Up
| | |
+------------------------+------------------------------------+
| | |
Sweden Australia America
Savoury pancakes are very unusual here.
Well, do you consider them a meal or a dessert? They used to
be considered a dessert [1] here, but that's changing.

I had food-pancakes in Sydney, in a foodcourt.

[1] Or a sort of second course after soup, preferably pea
soup and eaten on thursdas. Hot punch optional.
--
Elin
The Tale of Westala and Villtin
http://tale.cunobaros.com/
The Oswalds DW casting award - Vote Now!
http://www.student.lu.se/~his02ero/Oswald/index.html
Flesh-eating Dragon
2006-03-04 15:24:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Graycat
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Savoury pancakes are very unusual here.
Well, do you consider them a meal or a dessert? They used to
be considered a dessert [1] here, but that's changing.
A meal ... or rather, I consider *two* pancakes to be a meal ... but a
somewhat *unusual* meal in which there is no savoury course. This would
be because pancakes are more nutritious than typical desserts
(remember, my family's recipe contains one whole egg per person), so
they serve the role of both main course (nutrition - up to a point,
better than a lot of junk food, anyway) and dessert (sweetness)
simultaneously.

When I lived with my parents, we had pancakes as a meal every Sunday
evening.

Adrian.
RuneMaster
2006-03-05 13:17:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Graycat
Or a sort of second course after soup, preferably pea
soup and eaten on thursdas. Hot punch optional.
Aha, I remember green pea soup with mustard, with hot Punch [1] from
visits to Stockholm & Uppsala. I seem to recall that this is a
traditional student dish commemorating something or another. Can you
explain?



[1] weird but delicious - the mustard was a runny Dijon-type; quite mild
compared with yellow English stuff.
--
Use common sense to reply

Conservatives are not necessarily stupid, but most stupid people are
conservatives.
John Stuart Mill
English economist & philosopher (1806 - 1873)
Flesh-eating Dragon
2006-03-05 13:38:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by RuneMaster
Post by Graycat
Or a sort of second course after soup, preferably pea
soup and eaten on thursdas. Hot punch optional.
Aha, I remember green pea soup with mustard, with hot Punch [1] from
visits to Stockholm & Uppsala. I seem to recall that this is a
traditional student dish commemorating something or another. Can you
explain?
What I want to know is: how can you recognise pea soup if it doesn't
have a meat pie floating in it to tell you that it *is* pea soup?

Adrian.

(Actually, I've never eaten a floater, never been seriously offered
one, and the only time I've seen one eaten was at a food guzzling
competition which was actually an advertising gimmick for a
then-upcoming youth convention. But don't tell anyone.)
RuneMaster
2006-03-05 17:54:40 UTC
Permalink
On 5 Mar 2006 05:38:33 -0800, Flesh-eating Dragon <***@netyp.com.au>
wrote:


<snippity>
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
What I want to know is: how can you recognise pea soup if it doesn't
have a meat pie floating in it to tell you that it *is* pea soup?
Adrian.
How about "Because it's (1) green amd (2) liquid (for any definition of
"liquid" i.e. if you can't eat it with a fork, it must be soup!
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
(Actually, I've never eaten a floater, never been seriously offered
one, and the only time I've seen one eaten was at a food guzzling
competition which was actually an advertising gimmick for a
then-upcoming youth convention. But don't tell anyone.)
I won't if you won't :-)
--
Use common sense to reply

Conservatives are not necessarily stupid, but most stupid people are
conservatives.
John Stuart Mill
English economist & philosopher (1806 - 1873)
Alec Cawley
2006-03-05 19:59:55 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@thesimonsfamily>, ***@lspace.org
says...
Post by RuneMaster
<snippity>
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
What I want to know is: how can you recognise pea soup if it doesn't
have a meat pie floating in it to tell you that it *is* pea soup?
Adrian.
How about "Because it's (1) green amd (2) liquid (for any definition of
"liquid" i.e. if you can't eat it with a fork, it must be soup!
Chartreuse? Lubricating oil? Glacier meltwater? Cartoon poisons?
Maaike
2006-03-05 16:13:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
What I want to know is: how can you recognise pea soup if it doesn't
have a meat pie floating in it to tell you that it *is* pea soup?
It's the turnip, carrot and salt meat that give it away.

HTH, HAND.

-Maaike
Graycat
2006-03-05 19:10:32 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 5 Mar 2006 13:17:01 +0000 (UTC), RuneMaster
Post by RuneMaster
Post by Graycat
Or a sort of second course after soup, preferably pea
soup and eaten on thursdas. Hot punch optional.
Aha, I remember green pea soup with mustard, with hot Punch [1] from
visits to Stockholm & Uppsala. I seem to recall that this is a
traditional student dish commemorating something or another. Can you
explain?
Um...well...not really it would appear. For some reason that
I don't know[1] it is traditional to eat pea soup and punch
(though I've never had green pea soup) on thursdays. Just
like you eat roasts on sundays and candy on saturdays.

[1] I have googled and came up with two things:
1) an article in a popular history magazine which would
probably have been most helpful if I had been able to read
it. But since I didn't have the code you get when you buy
the paper version, i couldn't.
2) some info from the Swedish army. It appears that pea soup
and pancakes has been served every thursday in the canteens
as far back as anyone can remember. The rumor goes that this
started in the late 18th C when Gustav III (king of Sweden)
decided two things. The first was that all the peas
harvested in Sweden and Finland had to get eaten before next
year's harvest. The second was that making people eat peas
every day all summer was just cruel. So a compromise was
settled on: peas every thursday forever...
--
Elin
The Tale of Westala and Villtin
http://tale.cunobaros.com/
The Oswalds DW casting award - Vote Now!
http://www.student.lu.se/~his02ero/Oswald/index.html
April Goodwin-Smith
2006-03-04 18:12:44 UTC
Permalink
"Flesh-eating Dragon" wrote ...
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
The impression I get from this thread is that what Naomi calls
"swedish pancakes" are simply, um, *pancakes*. Of the type
that are simply called *pancakes* in Australia and many other
countries *anyway*. American pancakes have baking powder
in them and get a lot thicker. Also they are smaller an un-rollable.
Over there thin pancakes get called crepes. (iirc)
Do Americans have pikelets? (i.e. like pancakes, but smaller,
thicker, and sweeter)
In Canada there are pancakes, flapjacks, and them forn things
called crepes.

Pancakes are made from a thick batter, about 4 to 6 inches
in diameter, from 1/2 to 3/4 an inch thick - and they are
disgusting (even if your dad is renowned for his buttermilk
pancakes, bleah). Dollar pancakes are made from the same
batter, and about 2 inches in diameter, and made in an effort
to entice reluctant children to suddenly discover the light about
pancakes (not guaranteed to work, bleah). Both are served
hot in stacks of two or three (sometimes they are shown in
higher stacks, but usually only in syrup commmercials), with
butter in between the layers and on top, then drenched in
syrup (maple, blueberry, whatever).[1] If you try to bend
them to roll them up, they will break.

Flapjacks are made from a runnier batter, cooked until
they are darker on both sides, with slightly bubblier edges,
slightly thinner, made 6 to 8 inches in diameter (without any
effort to entice children with cutesy versions), served in a similar
style to pancakes above, but I've often seen them served only
one at a time, especially at fundraiser pancake breakfasts.
You might have better luck rolling these up, but at best they
would be a thick revolting squudgy lump.

Pancakes & flapjacks are considered breakfast food, although
considering the longer cooking time, usually reserved for a
weekend breakfast, or a family reunion with a cast of millions.
Or the aforementioned fundraiser or promotional pancake
breakfast, where unskilled volunteers can't go too wrong with
a powdered mix & water.

Crepes were originally only served in restaurants, and they
are not something that would appear at any of my families'
tables for any meal. You can get very nice ones at the
Cafe du Soleil, in the 1300 block of Commercial Drive,
with either a sweet or a savory filling.

However, I'm a waffle girl, myself. Crispier, and more
hollows for melted butter, and you can add cocoa to the
batter and have chocolate waffles - mmmmmmmm. :)

So, if you order pancakes in Canada (& the USA), you
are going to be first: surprised, and then second: disgusted.

April.

[1] - let me just say a heartfelt YUCK here. Thank you.
April Goodwin-Smith
2006-03-04 18:18:15 UTC
Permalink
"April Goodwin-Smith" wrote ...
<snip>
Post by April Goodwin-Smith
Or the aforementioned fundraiser or promotional pancake
breakfast, where unskilled volunteers can't go too wrong with
a powdered mix & water.
<snip>

Sorry, replying to self, sorry sorry sorry.

I forgot the Shrove Tuesday Pancake Suppers, which
are the same as a fundraiser breakfast, only served after
work in the evening at the church hall.

April.
Lesley Weston
2006-03-05 00:26:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by April Goodwin-Smith
"April Goodwin-Smith" wrote ...
<snip>
Post by April Goodwin-Smith
Or the aforementioned fundraiser or promotional pancake
breakfast, where unskilled volunteers can't go too wrong with
a powdered mix & water.
<snip>
Sorry, replying to self, sorry sorry sorry.
I forgot the Shrove Tuesday Pancake Suppers, which
are the same as a fundraiser breakfast, only served after
work in the evening at the church hall.
Which kind of pancakes? In England, people make the crepes type for Shrove
Tuesday and serve them with a little caster (berry) sugar and a little
freshly-squeezed lemon juice and rolled up. We still carry on the tradition
here, so that I had a really busy time last week, making pancakes for
Tuesday and then Welsh cakes and a lamb-and-leek pie for Wednesday. Worth it
though, even though the pie should have been cawl and would have been if we
could have afforded the kind of lamb you need for that instead of the ground
(minced) lamb that will do for a pie. People don't seem to eat lamb much
here, so it's really expensive.
--
Lesley Weston.

Brightly_coloured_blob is real, but I don't often check even the few bits
that get through Yahoo's filters. To reach me, use leswes att shaw dott ca,
changing spelling and spacing as required.
April Goodwin-Smith
2006-03-05 07:32:20 UTC
Permalink
"Lesley Weston" wrote ...
<snip>
Post by Lesley Weston
Post by April Goodwin-Smith
I forgot the Shrove Tuesday Pancake Suppers, which
are the same as a fundraiser breakfast, only served after
work in the evening at the church hall.
Which kind of pancakes?
Not the crepe kind. No, indeedy.

April.
Daibhid Ceanaideach
2006-03-05 11:43:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lesley Weston
Post by April Goodwin-Smith
I forgot the Shrove Tuesday Pancake Suppers, which
are the same as a fundraiser breakfast, only served after
work in the evening at the church hall.
Which kind of pancakes? In England, people make the crepes
type for Shrove Tuesday and serve them with a little caster
(berry) sugar and a little freshly-squeezed lemon juice and
rolled up.
And, in some areas, have pancake races, where you have to run
while tossing a pancake. This tradition dates back centuries,
and no-one knows why, although the popular legend has it that
some people were still making their pancakes whrn the church
bell rang for the shriving, and ran to the church with the
frying pans.

Apparently there's a pancake race in Kansas. which I assume
uses the Ukian crepe version.
--
Dave
Official Absentee of EU Skiffeysoc
http://www.eusa.ed.ac.uk/societies/sesoc
"Be reasonable, demand the impossible now" -Robb Johnson
"Run before you walk, fly before you crawl" -Moist von Lipwig
Flesh-eating Dragon
2006-03-04 18:59:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by April Goodwin-Smith
Pancakes are made from a thick batter, about 4 to 6 inches
in diameter, from 1/2 to 3/4 an inch thick
Nononononononono!!!

I'd estimate that pancakes are about 8 or 9 inches in diameter, and
about 1/8 of an inch thick (I'm only estimating the thicknesses, you
understand, having not actually measured them, so these are intuitive
sounds-about-right values). Ingredients as previously given.

Pikelets are about 3 or 4 inches in diameter, and about 1/4 of an inch
thick. Unlike pancakes, the batter contains carb soda and sugar. The
recipes I have here include one tablespoon of sugar for every cup of
flour.

There is no such thing as a foodstuff which resembles a pancake but is
much thicker than 1/4 inch.
Post by April Goodwin-Smith
Both are served hot in stacks of two or three
You sometimes get stacked pancakes when you eat out, but such things
are very rare in home cooking, which is what I'm talking about.
Post by April Goodwin-Smith
higher stacks, but usually only in syrup commmercials), with
butter in between the layers and on top, then drenched in
syrup (maple, blueberry, whatever).[1] If you try to bend
them to roll them up, they will break.
There is no such thing as the imaginary foodstuff which you are
describing. <sef>

Adrian.
Daibhid Ceanaideach
2006-03-05 00:04:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by April Goodwin-Smith
Pancakes are made from a thick batter, about 4 to 6 inches
in diameter, from 1/2 to 3/4 an inch thick
Nononononononono!!!
<snip>
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
There is no such thing as the imaginary foodstuff which you
are describing. <sef>
You think she's talking crepe?
--
Dave
Official Absentee of EU Skiffeysoc
http://www.eusa.ed.ac.uk/societies/sesoc
"Be reasonable, demand the impossible now" -Robb Johnson
"Run before you walk, fly before you crawl" -Moist von Lipwig
gesso
2006-03-05 00:54:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by April Goodwin-Smith
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by April Goodwin-Smith
Pancakes are made from a thick batter, about 4 to 6 inches
in diameter, from 1/2 to 3/4 an inch thick
Nononononononono!!!
<snip>
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
There is no such thing as the imaginary foodstuff which you
are describing. <sef>
You think she's talking crepe?
Or maybe Auzzies have a batter definition of pancakes.

~Jess.
April Goodwin-Smith
2006-03-05 07:31:33 UTC
Permalink
"Flesh-eating Dragon" wrote ...
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by April Goodwin-Smith
Pancakes are made from a thick batter, about 4 to 6 inches
in diameter, from 1/2 to 3/4 an inch thick
Nononononononono!!!
<snip>
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
There is no such thing as the imaginary foodstuff which you are
describing. <sef>
I wish.

No, really.

Eeeeeew.


April.
Graycat
2006-03-04 21:41:23 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 04 Mar 2006 18:12:44 GMT, "April Goodwin-Smith"
Post by April Goodwin-Smith
In Canada there are pancakes, flapjacks, and them forn things
called crepes.
Pancakes are made from a thick batter, about 4 to 6 inches
in diameter, from 1/2 to 3/4 an inch thick - and they are
disgusting (even if your dad is renowned for his buttermilk
pancakes, bleah).
Oh goodie, I'm not alone in thinking this. Give me hash
browns for breakfast anyday.
--
Elin
The Tale of Westala and Villtin
http://tale.cunobaros.com/
The Oswalds DW casting award - Vote Now!
http://www.student.lu.se/~his02ero/Oswald/index.html
Arthur Hagen
2006-03-05 06:07:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Graycat
On Sat, 04 Mar 2006 18:12:44 GMT, "April Goodwin-Smith"
Post by April Goodwin-Smith
Pancakes are made from a thick batter, about 4 to 6 inches
in diameter, from 1/2 to 3/4 an inch thick - and they are
disgusting (even if your dad is renowned for his buttermilk
pancakes, bleah).
Oh goodie, I'm not alone in thinking this. Give me hash
browns for breakfast anyday.
Yeah, but hold the browns.

Regards,
--
*Art
April Goodwin-Smith
2006-03-05 07:31:41 UTC
Permalink
"Graycat" wrote ...
Post by April Goodwin-Smith
Pancakes are made from a thick batter, about 4 to 6 inches
in diameter, from 1/2 to 3/4 an inch thick - and they are
disgusting
Oh goodie, I'm not alone in thinking this. <snip>
Sing it, sister.

April.
Lesley Weston
2006-03-05 00:17:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by April Goodwin-Smith
"Flesh-eating Dragon" wrote ...
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
The impression I get from this thread is that what Naomi calls
"swedish pancakes" are simply, um, *pancakes*. Of the type
that are simply called *pancakes* in Australia and many other
countries *anyway*. American pancakes have baking powder
in them and get a lot thicker. Also they are smaller an un-rollable.
Over there thin pancakes get called crepes. (iirc)
Do Americans have pikelets? (i.e. like pancakes, but smaller,
thicker, and sweeter)
In Canada there are pancakes, flapjacks, and them forn things
called crepes.
Pancakes are made from a thick batter, about 4 to 6 inches
in diameter, from 1/2 to 3/4 an inch thick - and they are
disgusting
No they're not! Made properly so that they're light and fluffy, and served
with back bacon or the right kind of sausages with butter and *real* maple
syrup - yum!

<snip>
Post by April Goodwin-Smith
Pancakes & flapjacks are considered breakfast food, although
considering the longer cooking time, usually reserved for a
weekend breakfast, or a family reunion with a cast of millions.
Or the aforementioned fundraiser or promotional pancake
breakfast, where unskilled volunteers can't go too wrong with
a powdered mix & water.
Ah! There's the problem. They must be made from scratch and not mixed too
well, so that there are still lumps of eggy flour in them, and the batter
must be fairly thick. The pan must be *really* hot and *really* lightly
oiled with an oil that has no taste or colour and doesn't smoke, and they
must be cooked for as short a time as possible and served immediately. All
of this I have learned from bitter experience since coming to Canada.

<snip>
Post by April Goodwin-Smith
However, I'm a waffle girl, myself. Crispier, and more
hollows for melted butter, and you can add cocoa to the
batter and have chocolate waffles - mmmmmmmm. :)
Waffles are too difficult for me, and I've never had the courage to even
think about cleaning a waffle iron after use.
Post by April Goodwin-Smith
So, if you order pancakes in Canada (& the USA), you
are going to be first: surprised, and then second: disgusted.
Well yes, if you order them. Not if you make them, though.
--
Lesley Weston.

Brightly_coloured_blob is real, but I don't often check even the few bits
that get through Yahoo's filters. To reach me, use leswes att shaw dott ca,
changing spelling and spacing as required.
Flesh-eating Dragon
2006-03-05 02:23:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lesley Weston
Post by April Goodwin-Smith
Pancakes are made from a thick batter, about 4 to 6 inches
in diameter, from 1/2 to 3/4 an inch thick - and they are
disgusting
No they're not! Made properly so that they're light and fluffy, and served
with back bacon or the right kind of sausages with butter and *real* maple
syrup - yum!
Maple syrup with *meat*? You're weird. :-)

Most of the maple syrup that I use is squirted onto a bowl of fruit,
custard and muesli. I don't make pancakes for myself.

Adrian.
Arthur Hagen
2006-03-05 06:09:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Maple syrup with *meat*? You're weird. :-)
Ham is pretty good with either syrup or honey.

Regards,
--
*Art
Graycat
2006-03-05 08:26:11 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 5 Mar 2006 01:09:08 -0500, "Arthur Hagen"
Post by Arthur Hagen
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Maple syrup with *meat*? You're weird. :-)
Ham is pretty good with either syrup or honey.
And best with honey mustard :o)
--
Elin
The Tale of Westala and Villtin
http://tale.cunobaros.com/
The Oswalds DW casting award - Vote Now!
http://www.student.lu.se/~his02ero/Oswald/index.html
Lesley Weston
2006-03-05 18:24:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arthur Hagen
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Maple syrup with *meat*? You're weird. :-)
Ham is pretty good with either syrup or honey.
Indeed. The proper way to bake a ham is to stick it full of cloves and cover
it with a mixture of brown sugar and dry mustard. You do this for the last
half hour or so of baking, or after pre-cooking it in a slow-cooker which
leaves it tender and juicy.
--
Lesley Weston.

Brightly_coloured_blob is real, but I don't often check even the few bits
that get through Yahoo's filters. To reach me, use leswes att shaw dott ca,
changing spelling and spacing as required.
Lesley Weston
2006-03-05 18:25:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Lesley Weston
Post by April Goodwin-Smith
Pancakes are made from a thick batter, about 4 to 6 inches
in diameter, from 1/2 to 3/4 an inch thick - and they are
disgusting
No they're not! Made properly so that they're light and fluffy, and served
with back bacon or the right kind of sausages with butter and *real* maple
syrup - yum!
Maple syrup with *meat*? You're weird. :-)
Most of the maple syrup that I use is squirted onto a bowl of fruit,
custard and muesli. I don't make pancakes for myself.
Try it - you'll like it. Unless you agree with April, of course.
--
Lesley Weston.

Brightly_coloured_blob is real, but I don't often check even the few bits
that get through Yahoo's filters. To reach me, use leswes att shaw dott ca,
changing spelling and spacing as required.
Flesh-eating Dragon
2006-03-06 02:56:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lesley Weston
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Lesley Weston
No they're not! Made properly so that they're light and fluffy, and served
with back bacon or the right kind of sausages with butter and *real* maple
syrup - yum!
Maple syrup with *meat*? You're weird. :-)
Most of the maple syrup that I use is squirted onto a bowl of fruit,
custard and muesli. I don't make pancakes for myself.
Try it - you'll like it. Unless you agree with April, of course.
With some exceptions, I'm not keen on dishes with sweet-savoury mixes.
:-)

Adrian.
Maaike
2006-03-05 16:21:02 UTC
Permalink
[pancakes]
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Lesley Weston
No they're not! Made properly so that they're light and fluffy, and
served with back bacon or the right kind of sausages with butter and
*real* maple syrup - yum!
Maple syrup with *meat*? You're weird. :-)
Nononono. Maple syrup with *pork*. Any other meat would taste ick; pork
improves with sweetening.

-Maaike
April Goodwin-Smith
2006-03-05 07:32:07 UTC
Permalink
"Lesley Weston" wrote ...
<snip>
Post by Lesley Weston
Post by April Goodwin-Smith
Pancakes are made from a thick batter, about 4 to 6 inches
in diameter, from 1/2 to 3/4 an inch thick - and they are
disgusting
No they're not! Made properly so that they're light and fluffy,
and served with back bacon or the right kind of sausages with
butter and *real* maple syrup - yum!
Oh yes they are. Seriously, my dad is well-known for his skill
with the griddle, and he makes his batter from scratch, and people
are pounding their knives and forks on the table, saying, "yay, we
get to eat Jim's pancakes; we've been looking forward to this
ever since we knew we were coming out to BC."

And I'm in the background saying, "oh, gag a maggot."

<snip>
Post by Lesley Weston
<snip>
Post by April Goodwin-Smith
However, I'm a waffle girl, myself. Crispier, and more
hollows for melted butter, and you can add cocoa to the
batter and have chocolate waffles - mmmmmmmm. :)
Waffles are too difficult for me, and I've never had the
courage to even think about cleaning a waffle iron
after use.
Really? Waffles are easy peasy. Okay, my mom's old
waffle iron had removable plates for scrubbing in the sink,
and my new one has a teflon coating that just needs to be
wiped cleaned. The neato-keen thing about a waffle iron
is that you can do french toast in it, too. Crispy, dimpled
french toast - yum.

Oh yes, by waffle iron I mean the old fashioned ones with
lots of shallow dimples, not the so-called "belgium" waffles
with fewer deeper dents than make thicker waffles that have
a revolting similarity to the disgustingly squashy texture of
Canadian pancakes. No.

I never order waffles when out - they're never right.

April.
Lesley Weston
2006-03-05 17:39:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by April Goodwin-Smith
"Lesley Weston" wrote ...
<snip>
Post by Lesley Weston
Post by April Goodwin-Smith
Pancakes are made from a thick batter, about 4 to 6 inches
in diameter, from 1/2 to 3/4 an inch thick - and they are
disgusting
No they're not! Made properly so that they're light and fluffy,
and served with back bacon or the right kind of sausages with
butter and *real* maple syrup - yum!
Oh yes they are. Seriously, my dad is well-known for his skill
with the griddle, and he makes his batter from scratch, and people
are pounding their knives and forks on the table, saying, "yay, we
get to eat Jim's pancakes; we've been looking forward to this
ever since we knew we were coming out to BC."
And I'm in the background saying, "oh, gag a maggot."
Well, each to her own, of course.
Post by April Goodwin-Smith
<snip>
Post by Lesley Weston
<snip>
Post by April Goodwin-Smith
However, I'm a waffle girl, myself. Crispier, and more
hollows for melted butter, and you can add cocoa to the
batter and have chocolate waffles - mmmmmmmm. :)
Waffles are too difficult for me, and I've never had the
courage to even think about cleaning a waffle iron
after use.
Really? Waffles are easy peasy. Okay, my mom's old
waffle iron had removable plates for scrubbing in the sink,
and my new one has a teflon coating that just needs to be
wiped cleaned. The neato-keen thing about a waffle iron
is that you can do french toast in it, too. Crispy, dimpled
french toast - yum.
Oh yes, by waffle iron I mean the old fashioned ones with
lots of shallow dimples, not the so-called "belgium" waffles
with fewer deeper dents than make thicker waffles that have
a revolting similarity to the disgustingly squashy texture of
Canadian pancakes. No.
OK, you've convinced me. The rummage-sale season is just beginning and
waffle-irons are always featured, so I'll look out for them, while making
sure that the reason they're in the sale is not that the teflon has worn
off, and that the dimples are many and shallow. I also need a "new" electric
frypan for pancakes and Welsh cakes, since mine is covered with an
unremovable nasty mess caused by the polymerisation of the safflower oil I
used to use to grease it. I've found that it's possible to go to jumble
sales with a shopping list, and by the end of the season most of it has been
filled.
--
Lesley Weston.

Brightly_coloured_blob is real, but I don't often check even the few bits
that get through Yahoo's filters. To reach me, use leswes att shaw dott ca,
changing spelling and spacing as required.
Graycat
2006-03-05 08:21:37 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 05 Mar 2006 00:17:53 GMT, Lesley Weston
Post by Lesley Weston
Post by April Goodwin-Smith
"Flesh-eating Dragon" wrote ...
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
The impression I get from this thread is that what Naomi calls
"swedish pancakes" are simply, um, *pancakes*. Of the type
that are simply called *pancakes* in Australia and many other
countries *anyway*. American pancakes have baking powder
in them and get a lot thicker. Also they are smaller an un-rollable.
Over there thin pancakes get called crepes. (iirc)
Do Americans have pikelets? (i.e. like pancakes, but smaller,
thicker, and sweeter)
In Canada there are pancakes, flapjacks, and them forn things
called crepes.
Pancakes are made from a thick batter, about 4 to 6 inches
in diameter, from 1/2 to 3/4 an inch thick - and they are
disgusting
No they're not! Made properly so that they're light and fluffy, and served
with back bacon or the right kind of sausages with butter and *real* maple
syrup - yum!
Yes...and then they taste like bathroom sponges soaked in
sugar and fat. Vast improvement...
--
Elin
The Tale of Westala and Villtin
http://tale.cunobaros.com/
The Oswalds DW casting award - Vote Now!
http://www.student.lu.se/~his02ero/Oswald/index.html
raymond larsson
2006-03-06 02:48:25 UTC
Permalink
In article <C02F6E8B.42F4B%***@yahoo.co.uk>, Lesley
Weston says...
Post by Lesley Weston
Post by April Goodwin-Smith
However, I'm a waffle girl, myself. Crispier, and more
hollows for melted butter, and you can add cocoa to the
batter and have chocolate waffles - mmmmmmmm. :)
Waffles are too difficult for me, and I've never had the courage to even
think about cleaning a waffle iron after use.
Clean the iron after use ? You just wipe the outside with a damp cloth
after filling it. Seriously if the inside needs cleaning your iron (old-
fashioned) needs seasoning or there is not enough fat in your batter. On
the farm we had an old cast-iron iron, the only cleaning it got was the
gunk on the outside being burned off. There are newfangled electric ones
indicate when they are ready and when the waffles are done, and you
don't even have to flip it when you see steam coming out.

too have the iron hot enough, we had to use it with the stove lid off
over direct flame.
--
rgl
"Bother!" said Pooh. "I ache in the places where I used to play"
Carol Hague
2006-03-06 07:23:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by April Goodwin-Smith
Flapjacks are made from a runnier batter, cooked until
they are darker on both sides, with slightly bubblier edges,
slightly thinner, made 6 to 8 inches in diameter (
Yesterday I made a batch of something that are called flapjacks here -
basic ingredients being oats, golden syrup, sugar and butter, melted and
then baked into a flat cake.

Do they have these in Canadadia, and if so what do they call them?
--
Carol
Some are born weird, some achieve weirdness, and others
feed giraffes to the ceiling.
- Richard Robinson on uk.rec.sheds.
CCA
2006-03-04 18:44:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Do Americans have pikelets? (i.e. like pancakes, but smaller, thicker,
and sweeter)
We have them in the UK. Nice while they're warm.
CCA
Aquarion
2006-03-04 21:13:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by CCA
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Do Americans have pikelets? (i.e. like pancakes, but smaller, thicker,
and sweeter)
We have them in the UK. Nice while they're warm.
Yet in other parts of the UK, they are completely unknown to people who
don't read AFP.

Remember, "We do things differently here" is usually up to a diameter of
between one and one thousand metres...
Werehatrack
2006-03-05 18:38:36 UTC
Permalink
On 4 Mar 2006 05:36:45 -0800, "Flesh-eating Dragon"
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Graycat
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
The impression I get from this thread is that what Naomi calls "swedish
pancakes" are simply, um, *pancakes*. Of the type that are simply
called *pancakes* in Australia and many other countries *anyway*. So
I'm curious as to what her source is for calling them Swedish. After
all, it is undoubtably true that typical Australian pancakes can be -
and frequently are - rolled up.
American pancakes have baking powder in them and get a lot
thicker. Also they are smaller an un-rollable. Over there
thin pancakes get called crepes. (iirc)
Do Americans have pikelets? (i.e. like pancakes, but smaller, thicker,
and sweeter)
That's from the range referred to as "crepes" here, though I would not
be surprised if the jingoist forces demanded that the poncy French
name be stricken and a different term applied were crepes to become
more popular. As it is, they're sometimes regarded as wimpy junk that
only liberals and fags eat.
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Graycat
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
(c) Icecream and jam - in which case the pancake is eaten flat, 'cos
you can't roll up icecream.
Yes, you can. I have done so all my life. Swedish pancakes
are, to the best of my knowledge, always eaten rolled up, no
matter wether you put ice-cream or mushrooms in thick sause
(or anything else [1]) in them.
Always Often Not
Rolled Rolled Rolled
Up Up Up
| | |
+------------------------+------------------------------------+
| | |
Sweden Australia America
Place parts of America closer to Australia; there is regional and
cultural variance involved.
--
Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
Some gardening required to reply via email.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
Arthur Hagen
2006-03-05 22:28:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Graycat
On 4 Mar 2006 05:36:45 -0800, "Flesh-eating Dragon"
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Always Often Not
Rolled Rolled Rolled
Up Up Up
| | |
+------------------------+------------------------------------+
| | |
Sweden Australia America
Place parts of America closer to Australia; there is regional and
cultural variance involved.
I'd say one noticable difference is what's the main ingredient.

Eggs Grease Wheat Flour Baking Soda Maize Flour
+------------------------------+----------------------------------+
| | | | |
Scandiwegia Blighty Foureckss Canamerica Texico


Note that this is a sliding scale, so a Northern State pancake batter is
likely to contain lots of flour mix (wheat+maize with baking soda), with
smaller amounts of grease and very few eggs.
The high amount of eggs in some pancakes also means they have to be served
/hot/, as they stiffen up and become crusty very quickly. This might be the
main reason why they're not popular on the continent of lazy cooking.

Regards,
--
*Art
Werehatrack
2006-03-06 01:54:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arthur Hagen
Post by Graycat
On 4 Mar 2006 05:36:45 -0800, "Flesh-eating Dragon"
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Always Often Not
Rolled Rolled Rolled
Up Up Up
| | |
+------------------------+------------------------------------+
| | |
Sweden Australia America
Place parts of America closer to Australia; there is regional and
cultural variance involved.
I'd say one noticable difference is what's the main ingredient.
Eggs Grease Wheat Flour Baking Soda Maize Flour
+------------------------------+----------------------------------+
| | | | |
Scandiwegia Blighty Foureckss Canamerica Texico
Maize flour ("corn meal" to the Tex- locals, "harina de maiz" or
"masa" to the -Mex contingent depending on intended usage) is seldom
used in significant quantity in pancakes that are called by that name.
If the principal milled grain is maize, then it's cornbread, which is
baked more often than fried these days. Pan-fried cornbread is still
fairly common across the US South, though, but it's not considered a
pancake regardless of the fact that it's a cake made in a pan.
Post by Arthur Hagen
Note that this is a sliding scale, so a Northern State pancake batter is
likely to contain lots of flour mix (wheat+maize with baking soda)
Corn (maize) *flour* is almost absent from the majority of the US;
only a coarse-ground product (corn meal) is reliably available.
Although there are some who still use as much as half corn meal in
pancakes anywhere in the country, Northern pancakes are at least as
likely to contain little or no corn meal. There's more whey than corn
flour in the pancakes at McDonalds, for instance, and the most popular
pancake mix in the US (Bisquick) has none at all.
Post by Arthur Hagen
, with
smaller amounts of grease and very few eggs.
The eggishness is less regional IME, with dietary restrictions driving
it more oten than not. People who think that cholesterol is Bad For
You tend to eschew eggs, people who think that If It's Not Fattening,
It's Not Food tend to espouse eggs. And butter. Some consider
pancakes flavorless oif not fried in bacon drippings. My eldest
brother used to be in that contingent; I don't know if his habits have
changed.
Post by Arthur Hagen
The high amount of eggs in some pancakes also means they have to be served
/hot/, as they stiffen up and become crusty very quickly. This might be the
main reason why they're not popular on the continent of lazy cooking.
Actually, "hotcakes" (a synonym for pancakes in the US) are very
popular, served right off the griddle, and this is the case whether
they are high-egg or low-egg. Only a hotel breakfast buffet would try
to foist off pancakes that were not served within seconds after being
made. Even McDonalds understands this. Attempts to market frozen
pancakes have met with utter disdain several times. OTOH, we have
several restaurant chains whose mainstay is pancakes, including IHOP,
whose name originally was "International House Of Pancakes". (It's
about as international as most other things in the US, i.e. not
authentically anything except bland and overpriced.)
--
Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
Some gardening required to reply via email.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
Flesh-eating Dragon
2006-03-06 07:42:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arthur Hagen
I'd say one noticable difference is what's the main ingredient.
Eggs Grease Wheat Flour Baking Soda Maize Flour
+------------------------------+----------------------------------+
| | | | |
Scandiwegia Blighty Foureckss Canamerica Texico
The difficulty I have in interpreting Orjan's recipe is that the amount
of milk is measured in units called "dl", and I don't know what "dl" is
short for (I think we can establish that it's not decilitres), nor how
many mL it corresponds to. Also, I have no idea how many pancakes his
recipe is intended to make, to serve how many people. So I can't tell
from his recipe how much egg is actually in it, by proportion.

To summarise what I've already said, in my family's recipe there's half
an egg per pancake (two pancakes serves one person), and pancakes
contain twice as much egg as they do milk. This is more egg than the
/average/ Australian pancake, but it's still perfectly Australian -
merely an example from the more eggy end of the spectrum. What would
the egg:milk ratio by volume be in, say, one of Orjan's?
Post by Arthur Hagen
The high amount of eggs in some pancakes also means they have to be served
/hot/, as they stiffen up and become crusty very quickly. This might be the
main reason why they're not popular on the continent of lazy cooking.
Pancakes are always served straight off the frying pan. While one
pancake is being eaten, another is being cooked. You don't eat them
cold. However, there _is_ an exception. If the topping happens to be
icecream and jam, then a cold pancake is perfectly OK.

Adrian.
Natasja
2006-03-06 08:41:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Arthur Hagen
I'd say one noticable difference is what's the main ingredient.
Eggs Grease Wheat Flour Baking Soda Maize Flour
+------------------------------+----------------------------------+
| | | | |
Scandiwegia Blighty Foureckss Canamerica Texico
The difficulty I have in interpreting Orjan's recipe is that the amount
of milk is measured in units called "dl", and I don't know what "dl" is
short for (I think we can establish that it's not decilitres), nor how
many mL it corresponds to. Also, I have no idea how many pancakes his
recipe is intended to make, to serve how many people. So I can't tell
from his recipe how much egg is actually in it, by proportion.
To summarise what I've already said, in my family's recipe there's half
an egg per pancake (two pancakes serves one person), and pancakes
contain twice as much egg as they do milk. This is more egg than the
/average/ Australian pancake, but it's still perfectly Australian -
merely an example from the more eggy end of the spectrum. What would
the egg:milk ratio by volume be in, say, one of Orjan's?
Post by Arthur Hagen
The high amount of eggs in some pancakes also means they have to be served
/hot/, as they stiffen up and become crusty very quickly. This might be the
main reason why they're not popular on the continent of lazy cooking.
Pancakes are always served straight off the frying pan. While one
pancake is being eaten, another is being cooked. You don't eat them
cold. However, there _is_ an exception. If the topping happens to be
icecream and jam, then a cold pancake is perfectly OK.
Adrian.
If my memory serves me right: for Dutch pancakes you need 800 grams of
flower, 2 eggs and 1 L milk. And I think you can make 8 to 10 pancakes
with an inner diameter of 25 cm and a thinkness of circa 5 mm with
this. If you like thicker pancakes: use more flower.

These amounts are given in the well-known, scientifically approved and
world wide accepted SI-units and should not pose a problem.
jester
2006-03-06 11:19:20 UTC
Permalink
On 5 Mar 2006 23:42:12 -0800, Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
The difficulty I have in interpreting Orjan's recipe is that the amount
of milk is measured in units called "dl", and I don't know what "dl" is
short for (I think we can establish that it's not decilitres),
Think again. The swedes use decilitres as a very common unit of
measurement; moreso than millilitres in my experience.
--
Andy Brown
Real programmers don't comment their code. It was hard to write, it
should be hard to understand.
Graycat
2006-03-06 11:31:19 UTC
Permalink
On 5 Mar 2006 23:42:12 -0800, "Flesh-eating Dragon"
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Arthur Hagen
I'd say one noticable difference is what's the main ingredient.
Eggs Grease Wheat Flour Baking Soda Maize Flour
+------------------------------+----------------------------------+
| | | | |
Scandiwegia Blighty Foureckss Canamerica Texico
The difficulty I have in interpreting Orjan's recipe is that the amount
of milk is measured in units called "dl", and I don't know what "dl" is
short for (I think we can establish that it's not decilitres), nor how
many mL it corresponds to. Also, I have no idea how many pancakes his
recipe is intended to make, to serve how many people. So I can't tell
from his recipe how much egg is actually in it, by proportion.
Why would we be able to establish that it isn't decilitres?
I'm pretty certain that that's in fact what it is, since
that's probably the most common measure in Swedish cooking.
(together with table and tea spoons).
--
Elin
The Tale of Westala and Villtin
http://tale.cunobaros.com/
The Oswalds DW casting award - Vote Now!
http://www.student.lu.se/~his02ero/Oswald/index.html
Flesh-eating Dragon
2006-03-06 13:08:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Graycat
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Arthur Hagen
I'd say one noticable difference is what's the main ingredient.
Eggs Grease Wheat Flour Baking Soda Maize Flour
+------------------------------+----------------------------------+
| | | | |
Scandiwegia Blighty Foureckss Canamerica Texico
The difficulty I have in interpreting Orjan's recipe is that the amount
of milk is measured in units called "dl", and I don't know what "dl" is
short for (I think we can establish that it's not decilitres), nor how
many mL it corresponds to. Also, I have no idea how many pancakes his
recipe is intended to make, to serve how many people. So I can't tell
from his recipe how much egg is actually in it, by proportion.
Why would we be able to establish that it isn't decilitres?
I'm pretty certain that that's in fact what it is, since
that's probably the most common measure in Swedish cooking.
(together with table and tea spoons).
I believe the correct abbreviation for "litres" is always a capital L,
never a lowercase one, so it should be dL, not dl. Having said which, a
lot of measuring implements get this wrong (and have ml instead of mL),
but AIUI, they *are* wrong.

So, anyway, there's apparently 200mL of milk for every egg in Orjan's
recipe, so it therefore _doesn't_ follow Arthur's generalisation that
Scandinavian pancakes are typically high in egg.

Australian recipe #1 - 30mL milk per egg [1]
Swedish recipe #1 - 200mL milk per egg
Australian recipe #2 - 280mL milk per egg [2]

This confirms what I thought - that there is no difference between the
batters typically used in the two countries, insofar as we can tell
from the examples given.

I just wanted to be able to make some meaningful comparisons between
the recipes.

Adrian.

[1] Assuming one egg is 60mL, which is close enough. I don't have any
eggs to measure, but Google turned up this
http://www.unu.edu/unupress/food/8F082e/8F082E0c.htm and 60 is a nicer
figure to use in calculations than 55.

[2] Rounding off a pint to 560mL. Once again, it's close enough.
Orjan Westin
2006-03-06 13:28:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Graycat
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
The difficulty I have in interpreting Orjan's recipe is that the
amount of milk is measured in units called "dl", and I don't know
what "dl" is short for (I think we can establish that it's not
decilitres), nor how many mL it corresponds to.
Why would we be able to establish that it isn't decilitres?
I'm pretty certain that that's in fact what it is, since
that's probably the most common measure in Swedish cooking.
(together with table and tea spoons).
I believe the correct abbreviation for "litres" is always a capital L,
never a lowercase one, so it should be dL, not dl. Having said which,
a lot of measuring implements get this wrong (and have ml instead of
mL), but AIUI, they *are* wrong.
Where you are, not where I am.

<quote src="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Litre">
Symbols are written in lower case, except for symbols derived from the name
of a person. [...] The one exception is the litre, whose original symbol "l"
is dangerously similar to the numeral "1". The [National Institute of
Standards and Technology, US] recommends that "L" be used instead, a usage
which is common in the U.S., Canada and Australia, and has been accepted as
an alternative by the [General Conference on Weights and Measures].
</quote>

<quote src="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Litre">
The litre (spelled litre in Commonwealth English and liter in American
English) is a unit of volume. There are two official symbols: lowercase l
and uppercase L.
</quote>
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
So, anyway, there's apparently 200mL of milk for every egg in Orjan's
recipe, so it therefore _doesn't_ follow Arthur's generalisation that
Scandinavian pancakes are typically high in egg.
Australian recipe #1 - 30mL milk per egg [1]
Swedish recipe #1 - 200mL milk per egg
Australian recipe #2 - 280mL milk per egg [2]
This confirms what I thought - that there is no difference between the
batters typically used in the two countries, insofar as we can tell
from the examples given.
I guess the first au one is missing a zero, otherwise I can't see how you
claim there's no difference. Even so, assuming it's supposed to be 300ml,
the au ones have 40-50% more milk per egg.
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Graycat
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Also, I have no
idea how many pancakes his recipe is intended to make, to serve how
many people. So I can't tell from his recipe how much egg is
actually in it, by proportion.
I've got no idea either - it depends on how hungry people are and what
fillings you put on. In my pan, I usually get around a dozen pancakes out
of the above, unless I want to show off and make them really thin, in which
case I can get up to twenty. The diameter of my pan is (and I can't believe
I actually went and measured this last night) 23cm.

Orjan
--
The Tale of Westala and Villtin
http://tale.cunobaros.com/
Fiction, Thoughts and Software
http://www.cunobaros.com/
Flesh-eating Dragon
2006-03-06 14:22:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Orjan Westin
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
So, anyway, there's apparently 200mL of milk for every egg in Orjan's
recipe, so it therefore _doesn't_ follow Arthur's generalisation that
Scandinavian pancakes are typically high in egg.
Australian recipe #1 - 30mL milk per egg [1]
Swedish recipe #1 - 200mL milk per egg
Australian recipe #2 - 280mL milk per egg [2]
This confirms what I thought - that there is no difference between the
batters typically used in the two countries, insofar as we can tell
from the examples given.
I guess the first au one is missing a zero,
No, it isn't.
Post by Orjan Westin
otherwise I can't see how you claim there's no difference.
Because if an Australian pancake can have anything from 30 to 300mL
milk per egg, depending on the recipe, then a Swedish one of 200mL milk
per egg is within that range, and therefore unremarkable, from an
Australian POV.

Adrian.
Arthur Hagen
2006-03-06 13:40:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
I believe the correct abbreviation for "litres" is always a capital L,
never a lowercase one, so it should be dL, not dl. Having said which,
a lot of measuring implements get this wrong (and have ml instead of
mL), but AIUI, they *are* wrong.
Lower case "l" is indeed the abbreviation for litres in historical context,
and many countries still cling to it.
If you want to be /correct/, use m^3 or mm^3 for volume...
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
So, anyway, there's apparently 200mL of milk for every egg in Orjan's
recipe, so it therefore _doesn't_ follow Arthur's generalisation that
Scandinavian pancakes are typically high in egg.
Relative to how much flour there is, the egg content is rather high.
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Australian recipe #1 - 30mL milk per egg [1]
Since you appear to want to use the /standard/ notations, note this SI rule:
"There is a space between the numerical value and unit symbol, even when the
value is used in an adjectival sense, except in the case of superscript
units for plane angle."
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Swedish recipe #1 - 200mL milk per egg
Australian recipe #2 - 280mL milk per egg [2]
This confirms what I thought - that there is no difference between the
batters typically used in the two countries, insofar as we can tell
from the examples given.
Huh? How much /flour/ is there in each recipe?
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
[2] Rounding off a pint to 560mL. Once again, it's close enough.
The size of a pint differs depending on where you are. In the US, it's
/less/ than half a litre (and their beer is weaker too).

Regards,
--
*Art
Flesh-eating Dragon
2006-03-06 14:30:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arthur Hagen
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Australian recipe #1 - 30mL milk per egg [1]
"There is a space between the numerical value and unit symbol, even when the
value is used in an adjectival sense, except in the case of superscript
units for plane angle."
I haven't said anything pedantic about notations. I only mentioned the
issue of mL versus ml in the context of explaining why I didn't suspect
dl refered to decilitres.
Post by Arthur Hagen
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Swedish recipe #1 - 200mL milk per egg
Australian recipe #2 - 280mL milk per egg [2]
This confirms what I thought - that there is no difference between the
batters typically used in the two countries, insofar as we can tell
from the examples given.
Huh? How much /flour/ is there in each recipe?
One of the recipes says that one should mix liquid and solid
ingredients until the consistency is right. If you'd like to quantify
that, be my guest. :-)

IMO, it makes more sense to define egginess in terms of the proportion
of _liquid_ that is egg, otherwise what you're really comparing is the
consistency of the batter, and differences in the proportions of
individual ingredients are merely side-effects of that underlying
difference.
Post by Arthur Hagen
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
[2] Rounding off a pint to 560mL. Once again, it's close enough.
The size of a pint differs depending on where you are. In the US, it's
/less/ than half a litre (and their beer is weaker too).
Yes, I know (albeit only because I googled for it). But this was from
my grandmother's recipe book, and I'd place bets on it referring to
British pints, on account of Australia's British heritage.

Adrian.
Arthur Hagen
2006-03-06 18:43:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Arthur Hagen
Huh? How much /flour/ is there in each recipe?
One of the recipes says that one should mix liquid and solid
ingredients until the consistency is right. If you'd like to quantify
that, be my guest. :-)
IMO, it makes more sense to define egginess in terms of the proportion
of _liquid_ that is egg, otherwise what you're really comparing is the
consistency of the batter, and differences in the proportions of
individual ingredients are merely side-effects of that underlying
difference.
Don't forget that when you cook an egg, it becomes solids, not a liquid.
Since it's the end result that matters, I think it's much more fair to
compare the amount of eggs to the amount of flour, and not to to the liquids
(milk, buttermilk, cream, water, butter). My guess is that as the amount of
eggs increase, the amount of /flour/ (wheat and/or maize flour) decreases,
on average.

Examples from a quick Google (leaving minor ingredients out):

a) Scandinavian: 4 eggs, 300 ml flour, 500 ml milk and cream
b) Scandinavian: 3 eggs, 250 ml flour, 600 ml milk
c) American: 1 egg , 400 ml flour, 350 ml buttermilk
d) Canadian: 3 eggs, 400 ml flour, 400 ml 2 % milk
e) French: 2 eggs, 200 ml flour, 300 ml milk and butter

If adjusting to the same total amount of batter solids, I see a trend of
egginess being inversely proportional to flouriness. With variations, of
course. (c) and (d) also had baking powder, and (c) had 50% maize flour,
both of which affects consistency. (b) and (e) both had sugar, which
shouldn't affect the consistency, but will affect how quickly they brown.
The Canadian recipe was by far the healthiest, up until the serving (with
slabs of butter and drenched in maple syrup).

The only /certain/ thing is that there's probably as many different pancake
recipes as there are pancake cooks. The serving varies immensely too,
including whipped cream, bacon BCBs, syrups, sugars, goat cheese, jam, fried
eggs or kiwi slices[1].

[1]: Presumably the fruit. I'm not a nuzzie, so I wouldn't know for sure.

Regards,
--
*Art
Orjan Westin
2006-03-04 14:29:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Graycat
On 4 Mar 2006 04:42:21 -0800, "Flesh-eating Dragon"
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
(c) Icecream and jam - in which case the pancake is eaten flat, 'cos
you can't roll up icecream.
Yes, you can. I have done so all my life. Swedish pancakes
are, to the best of my knowledge, always eaten rolled up, no
matter wether you put ice-cream or mushrooms in thick sause
(or anything else [1]) in them.
[1] Though ketchup is apparently not to be recommended.
They're sometimes eaten folded twice, forming a quarter-circle wedge.

Ketchup isn't good, I know, but a spicy tomato sauce with some grated cheese
(or chunks of feta) is a very nice filling.

Orjan
--
Get your Tale paperback or CD here:
http://tale.cunobaros.com
Or just read it there, if you don't want the illustrations
Marco Villalta
2006-03-05 14:15:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Graycat
So I'm curious as to what her source is for calling them
Swedish. After all, it is undoubtably true that typical
Australian pancakes can be - and frequently are - rolled up.
American pancakes have baking powder in them and get a lot
thicker. Also they are smaller an un-rollable. Over there
thin pancakes get called crepes. (iirc)
Crêpes is just a fancy French name for pancakes, in my book. I
call them crêpes when eating them with a savoury filling, and
pancakes when eating them with something sweet.

Crêpes also often get gratinated in the oven, in this house.
Post by Graycat
Swedish pancakes are, to the best of my knowledge, always
eaten rolled up,
Not always, but very seldom not.
--
Marco Villalta -- afpStuff in headers
Flesh-eating Dragon
2006-03-06 07:44:15 UTC
Permalink
I call them crêpes when eating them with a savoury filling, and
pancakes when eating them with something sweet.
I vote that we make this the internationally compulsory terminology.

Adrian.
Lesley Weston
2006-03-04 23:58:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Orjan Westin
Post by naomi
Calling all Swede's (gee you guys are popular atm), I 've misplaced,
lost or eaten my recipie for swedish style pancakes. I have a bid
craving, would you share your recipies with me. I can't remember the
proper name,but they are the type that are thin and you can roll them
up.
6dl milk (unskimmed)
3dl white wheat flour
3 eggs
A pinch of salt.
Mix milk and flour, add salt and eggs. Stir. Fry in butter. Best results
from a non-non-stick cast iron frying pan.
The impression I get from this thread is that what Naomi calls "swedish
pancakes" are simply, um, *pancakes*.
Except that the batter for what I used to call pancakes in England and now
call crepes in Canada (except when it's just the two of us at home) has less
egg in it.
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Of the type that are simply
called *pancakes* in Australia and many other countries *anyway*.
That would be Australia (and some other ex-Empire countries) and the UK.
Other European countries have their own names for them, and North America
calls them crepes.
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
So
I'm curious as to what her source is for calling them Swedish. After
all, it is undoubtably true that typical Australian pancakes can be -
and frequently are - rolled up.
For reference, below are two Australian pancake recipes. I include two
because, of course, every family has its own variation, so including
more than one helps to indicate the range of variations that are
accepted under the banner of "the normal sort of pancake".
In this context, "normal" is the quintessential example of an idiosyncratic
value judgement.
--
Lesley Weston.

Brightly_coloured_blob is real, but I don't often check even the few bits
that get through Yahoo's filters. To reach me, use leswes att shaw dott ca,
changing spelling and spacing as required.
Werehatrack
2006-03-05 18:05:59 UTC
Permalink
On 4 Mar 2006 04:42:21 -0800, "Flesh-eating Dragon"
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
(a) Lemon and sugar - in which case the pancake is usually rolled up.
Lemon curd works well this way.
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
(b) Maple syrup - in which case the pancake is usually rolled up.
Rolling, here, is usually done as a means of making the result into
finger food; rolling and chunking to eayt with a fork isn't customary,
but isn't outrageous behaviour either.
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
(c) Icecream and jam - in which case the pancake is eaten flat, 'cos
you can't roll up icecream.
Flip one edge in; roll the rest of the cake at a 90 degree angle to
the flap; ice cream burrito! That's been done here more than a few
times, and though it can be messy (and needs to be eaten swiftly),
it's quite good.
--
Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
Some gardening required to reply via email.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
Stacie Hanes
2006-03-05 20:49:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Graycat
On 4 Mar 2006 04:42:21 -0800, "Flesh-eating Dragon"
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
(a) Lemon and sugar - in which case the pancake is usually rolled up.
Lemon curd works well this way.
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
(b) Maple syrup - in which case the pancake is usually rolled up.
Bob Evans, an American chain restaurant, now has crepes with vanilla cream
cheese inside and tart raspberry topping. They're very good.

I also like the Swedish pancakes at IHOP, but I imagine they might make
authentic Swedes turn slightly green. Who knows...but they're very thin,
served folded into quarters with lingonberry butter and lingonberry jam.
--
Stacie, fourth swordswoman of the afpocalypse.
AFPMinister of Flexible Weapons & Bondage-happy predator
AFPMistress to peachy ashie passion & AFPDeliciousSnack to 8'FED
"If you can't be a good example, you'll just have to be a horrible
warning." Catherine Aird, _His Burial Too_
http://esmeraldus.blogspot.com/
Arthur Hagen
2006-03-05 22:37:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stacie Hanes
I also like the Swedish pancakes at IHOP, but I imagine they might
make authentic Swedes turn slightly green. Who knows...but they're
very thin, served folded into quarters with lingonberry butter and
lingonberry jam.
IHOP is an abomination unto [insert favourite deity]. What they serve with
European names is something you'd /never/ see in those regions. They
wouldn't recognise a European pancake if it hit them edge on. IMHO, the
only "International" thing about them is that they exist in both the US and
Canada.
The only worse fake Euroethnic restaurant chain I've been to is the "Swiss
Chalet" franchise, popular in the Northwest IIRC. What they serve as
"authentic" Swiss food is better left unmentioned.

Regards,
--
*Art
Stacie Hanes
2006-03-05 22:54:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arthur Hagen
Post by Stacie Hanes
I also like the Swedish pancakes at IHOP, but I imagine they might
make authentic Swedes turn slightly green. Who knows...but they're
very thin, served folded into quarters with lingonberry butter and
lingonberry jam.
IHOP is an abomination unto [insert favourite deity]. What they
See, I knew that. But the wossnames on the menu as "Swedish pancakes" are
still pretty tasty, IMO.
--
Stacie, fourth swordswoman of the afpocalypse.
AFPMinister of Flexible Weapons & Bondage-happy predator
AFPMistress to peachy ashie passion & AFPDeliciousSnack to 8'FED
"If you can't be a good example, you'll just have to be a horrible
warning." Catherine Aird, _His Burial Too_
http://esmeraldus.blogspot.com/
Werehatrack
2006-03-06 01:59:45 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 05 Mar 2006 22:54:26 GMT, "Stacie Hanes"
Post by Stacie Hanes
Post by Arthur Hagen
Post by Stacie Hanes
I also like the Swedish pancakes at IHOP, but I imagine they might
make authentic Swedes turn slightly green. Who knows...but they're
very thin, served folded into quarters with lingonberry butter and
lingonberry jam.
IHOP is an abomination unto [insert favourite deity]. What they
See, I knew that. But the wossnames on the menu as "Swedish pancakes" are
still pretty tasty, IMO.
I have eaten at IHOP only under duress in most instances, and the
record has been consistent. Everything they served tasted vaguely
like a fried floury something-or-other *except* the pancakes, which
had a consistency more suitable for overly diluted wallpaper paste
that had gone past its use-by date while being stored in the engine
compartment of a city bus. The flavor might have been improved had it
actually been prepared that way.

The real pancake-related challenge here in Houston is finding a decent
*and authentic* blintz. It's next to impossible. There are platable
imitations, but they're really not the same at all.
--
Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
Some gardening required to reply via email.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
Stacie Hanes
2006-03-06 02:06:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Werehatrack
On Sun, 05 Mar 2006 22:54:26 GMT, "Stacie Hanes"
Post by Stacie Hanes
Post by Arthur Hagen
Post by Stacie Hanes
I also like the Swedish pancakes at IHOP, but I imagine they
might make authentic Swedes turn slightly green. Who knows...but
they're very thin, served folded into quarters with lingonberry
butter and lingonberry jam.
IHOP is an abomination unto [insert favourite deity]. What they
See, I knew that. But the wossnames on the menu as "Swedish
pancakes" are still pretty tasty, IMO.
I have eaten at IHOP only under duress in most instances, and the
record has been consistent. Everything they served tasted vaguely
like a fried floury something-or-other *except* the pancakes, which
had a consistency more suitable for overly diluted wallpaper paste
that had gone past its use-by date while being stored in the engine
compartment of a city bus. The flavor might have been improved had
it actually been prepared that way.
That's pretty dire. What can I say? I'd endure a lot for lingonberry jam.

Or I have no taste buds. Or I'd like real Swedish pancakes better. Or the
IHOP here is nicer--althought this last seems unlikely.
--
Stacie, fourth swordswoman of the afpocalypse.
AFPMinister of Flexible Weapons & Bondage-happy predator
AFPMistress to peachy ashie passion & AFPDeliciousSnack to 8'FED
"If you can't be a good example, you'll just have to be a horrible
warning." Catherine Aird, _His Burial Too_
http://esmeraldus.blogspot.com/
Werehatrack
2006-03-06 06:59:12 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 06 Mar 2006 02:06:15 GMT, "Stacie Hanes"
...What can I say? I'd endure a lot for lingonberry jam.
Available at any Ikea, oddly enough, and there's a large one nearby.
I've never tried lingonberry jam. Perhaps I'll pick up a jar
sometime.
--
Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
Some gardening required to reply via email.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
Michael J. Schülke
2006-03-06 09:20:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Werehatrack
Available at any Ikea, oddly enough, and there's a large one nearby.
There's always a large one nearby, isn't there?

Michael
Natasja
2006-03-06 07:23:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Graycat
On 4 Mar 2006 04:42:21 -0800, "Flesh-eating Dragon"
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
(a) Lemon and sugar - in which case the pancake is usually rolled up.
Lemon curd works well this way.
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
(b) Maple syrup - in which case the pancake is usually rolled up.
Rolling, here, is usually done as a means of making the result into
finger food; rolling and chunking to eayt with a fork isn't customary,
but isn't outrageous behaviour either.
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
(c) Icecream and jam - in which case the pancake is eaten flat, 'cos
you can't roll up icecream.
Flip one edge in; roll the rest of the cake at a 90 degree angle to
the flap; ice cream burrito! That's been done here more than a few
times, and though it can be messy (and needs to be eaten swiftly),
it's quite good.
--
Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
Some gardening required to reply via email.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
Well, I am from the Netherlands and I always thought pancakes were a
kind of typical Dutch meal. Apparently, I was wrong. Ours are thin
(max. 0.5 cm), mainly consist of milk and flower and only have one egg
per 0.5 L milk...(that's about 4 large pancakes with an inner diameter
of 25 cm). We eat them or with cheese..or with bacon and syrup. I
prefer them with a bit of sugar and cinnamon. They're also nice with
apples and raisins (with sugar and cinnamon). And the ones which are
leftover I always eat for lunch the next day, cold and again with sugar
and cinnamon.Our pancakes are a bit of a meal (lunch or diner) you
treat yourself with. It is also a favorite with children and eaten a
lot on childeren's parties. So, I guess they are a bit like the Swedish
ones?
Kimberley Verburg
2006-03-06 14:04:02 UTC
Permalink
[...] We eat them or with cheese..or with bacon and syrup. I
prefer them with a bit of sugar and cinnamon. They're also nice with
apples and raisins (with sugar and cinnamon). And the ones which are
leftover I always eat for lunch the next day, cold and again with sugar
and cinnamon.Our pancakes are a bit of a meal (lunch or diner) you
treat yourself with. It is also a favorite with children and eaten a
lot on childeren's parties. So, I guess they are a bit like the Swedish
ones?
I think the Dutch pancake recipe is the Swedish one (with variations
according individual taste) but the standard toppings seem to be
different. Except Elin's applemash sounds like it could be our
appelmoes. I should also point out to the assembled that the syrup used
isn't golden syrup or maple syrup but is of a different yummy sort.

Dammit, I'm getting hungry and it's only been six days since Shrove Tuesday.
--
Kimberley Verburg
***@lspace.org
Stig M. Valstad
2006-03-06 12:00:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Orjan Westin
Post by naomi
Calling all Swede's (gee you guys are popular atm), I 've misplaced,
lost or eaten my recipie for swedish style pancakes. I have a bid
craving, would you share your recipies with me. I can't remember the
proper name,but they are the type that are thin and you can roll them up.
6dl milk (unskimmed)
3dl white wheat flour
3 eggs
A pinch of salt.
That's the same I use, except I halve it (using 2 eggs) to
give me enough for dinner and breakfast the next morning.
Post by Orjan Westin
Mix milk and flour, add salt and eggs. Stir. Fry in butter. Best results
from a non-non-stick cast iron frying pan.
Interestingly my mother claims she can't make pancakes in
her cast iron frying pan, while I get better results from
the cast iron frying pan than my old non-stick frying pan.
--
Stig M. Valstad

"The grass is always greener when the other bastard is smoking it..."
Douglas H. Quebbeman
naomi
2006-03-05 03:05:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
The impression I get from this thread is that what Naomi calls "swedish
pancakes" are simply, um, *pancakes*. Of the type that are simply
called *pancakes* in Australia and many other countries *anyway*. So
I'm curious as to what her source is for calling them Swedish. After
all, it is undoubtably true that typical Australian pancakes can be -
and frequently are - rolled up.
For reference, below are two Australian pancake recipes. I include two
because, of course, every family has its own variation, so including
more than one helps to indicate the range of variations that are
accepted under the banner of "the normal sort of pancake".
(a) Lemon and sugar - in which case the pancake is usually rolled up.
(b) Maple syrup - in which case the pancake is usually rolled up.
(c) Icecream and jam - in which case the pancake is eaten flat, 'cos
you can't roll up icecream.
Adrian.
In my family ( my Dad is from finland and even though mum's family is
aussie she didn't learn to cook till after they were married so mainly
cooked scandinavian style things) we had two pancake recipes.

one of them was a finnish style pancake. I'm sure one of the finnish
afp'ers have described this in another cooking thread. it is cooked in a
pan in the oven and you sliced it into serves , it is about 2.5
cetimetres thick.

The other is from a recipe which a swedish friend gave her and is more
like what you call a 'normal' pancake. As we grew up asking for either
finnish 'oven' pancake or swedish pancake these are the two I know.

When I have eaten pancakes at other people's houses they have either
been piklets (tiny pancakes which are made from about a table spoon of
batter and are quite thick) or if they have called them pancakes it is
like the same thickness but bigger.

I'm sorry I've offended you Adrian, I asked for swedish pancakes
because that is what I grew up eating and have no idea about pancake
recipies used in other Aussie families and I don't like the recipie my
husband grew up using.
naomi
Flesh-eating Dragon
2006-03-05 03:46:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by naomi
I'm sorry I've offended you Adrian,
What? Huh? Where on earth do you get the impression that you offended
me?

You *surprised* me, and you also made me *interested* to know why you
call them Swedish.

If it's a habit of yours to assume that people are offended just
because they argue with you, I reckon we ought to break that habit.
Here. <passes Naomi an axe> Very useful for breaking things.

Adrian.
naomi
2006-03-05 04:07:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by naomi
I'm sorry I've offended you Adrian,
What? Huh? Where on earth do you get the impression that you offended
me?
You *surprised* me, and you also made me *interested* to know why you
call them Swedish.
If it's a habit of yours to assume that people are offended just
because they argue with you, I reckon we ought to break that habit.
Here. <passes Naomi an axe> Very useful for breaking things.
Adrian.
Thankyou Adrian, I shall employ it regularly.

Naomi

Wielder of the mighty axe 'Habit breaker'.
Graycat
2006-03-05 08:25:11 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 05 Mar 2006 03:05:22 GMT, naomi
Post by naomi
In my family ( my Dad is from finland and even though mum's family is
aussie she didn't learn to cook till after they were married so mainly
cooked scandinavian style things) we had two pancake recipes.
one of them was a finnish style pancake. I'm sure one of the finnish
afp'ers have described this in another cooking thread. it is cooked in a
pan in the oven and you sliced it into serves , it is about 2.5
cetimetres thick.
We have that here too, but we call them "oven pancakes". I
didn't like it when I was a kid, but I enjoy it more now.
Best results if you put bacon cubes (fried) in the pan
before pouring the batter in and serve it all with grated
carrots and lingonberry jam. Applemash (or whatever that
might actually be called in English) works too.
--
Elin
The Tale of Westala and Villtin
http://tale.cunobaros.com/
The Oswalds DW casting award - Vote Now!
http://www.student.lu.se/~his02ero/Oswald/index.html
Arthur Hagen
2006-03-05 11:34:14 UTC
Permalink
Applemash (or whatever that might actually be called in English) works
too.
"Apple sauce".

Regards,
--
*Art
X Kyle M Thompson
2006-03-05 18:05:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arthur Hagen
Applemash (or whatever that might actually be called in English) works
too.
"Apple sauce".
The trouble is, I like Apple Sauce and Mint Sauce[1], but eat
neither pork nor lamb. The other dat I had mint sauce with peas,
beans and chips.

kt.

[1] I even have a tattoo of him
Loading Image...
--
So I went to the dentist. He said 'Say Aaah.'
I said 'Why?'
He said 'My dog's died.'
Continue reading on narkive:
Loading...