Discussion:
[I] The Turtle Moves!
(too old to reply)
Andy Davison
2005-04-30 21:37:11 UTC
Permalink
I knew something odd had come up when the line controller made a radio
announcement to all Met drivers on the Uxbridge branch and started it with
"You're never going to believe this one". Apparently staff were on the
track between Hillingdon and Ickenham removing a turtle from the track.
Where the hell it came from, Om alone knows. Possibly escaped or was thrown
out by some unscrupulous owner when it got too big or something.
--
Andy Davison
***@oiyou.force9.co.uk
Lesley Weston
2005-05-01 14:47:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy Davison
I knew something odd had come up when the line controller made a radio
announcement to all Met drivers on the Uxbridge branch and started it with
"You're never going to believe this one". Apparently staff were on the
track between Hillingdon and Ickenham removing a turtle from the track.
Where the hell it came from, Om alone knows. Possibly escaped or was thrown
out by some unscrupulous owner when it got too big or something.
I know you're English, but do you really mean turtle, or are you being
courteous to transatlantics and you actually mean tortoise? Either way one
boggles, but rather more for a turtle than a tortoise.
--
Lesley Weston.

Brightly_coloured_blob is real, but I don't often check even the few bits
that get through Yahoo's filters. To reach me, use leswes att shaw dott ca,
changing spelling and spacing as required.
Flesh-eating Dragon
2005-05-01 16:27:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lesley Weston
I know you're English, but do you really mean turtle, or are you being
courteous to transatlantics and you actually mean tortoise? Either way one
boggles, but rather more for a turtle than a tortoise.
Some species of turtle do walk surprising distances over land; one of
them once turned up in my parents' shadehouse.

Adrian.
Lesley Weston
2005-05-02 15:53:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Lesley Weston
I know you're English, but do you really mean turtle, or are you being
courteous to transatlantics and you actually mean tortoise? Either way one
boggles, but rather more for a turtle than a tortoise.
Some species of turtle do walk surprising distances over land; one of
them once turned up in my parents' shadehouse.
Yes, but that's in Australia, where all the animals are... unusual.
--
Lesley Weston.

Brightly_coloured_blob is real, but I don't often check even the few bits
that get through Yahoo's filters. To reach me, use leswes att shaw dott ca,
changing spelling and spacing as required.
Flesh-eating Dragon
2005-05-02 16:59:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lesley Weston
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Lesley Weston
I know you're English, but do you really mean turtle, or are you being
courteous to transatlantics and you actually mean tortoise? Either way one
boggles, but rather more for a turtle than a tortoise.
Some species of turtle do walk surprising distances over land; one of
them once turned up in my parents' shadehouse.
Yes, but that's in Australia, where all the animals are... unusual.
I'm no turtle expert, but I expect that there are land-crossing
turtles all over the planet.

I have no idea what species the turtle I mentioned was, but it must
have been an escaped pet from the town that walked [1] two kilometers
across dry farmland to reach my parents' shadehouse, where it found
moisture. It was given a new home in my grandparents' pond. I don't
know if it's still there.

Here's one Australian turtle that crosses land:
http://faunanet.gov.au/wos/factfile.cfm?Fact_ID=287

Adrian.

[1] The turtle walked, not the town.
Lesley Weston
2005-05-03 22:15:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Lesley Weston
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Lesley Weston
I know you're English, but do you really mean turtle, or are you being
courteous to transatlantics and you actually mean tortoise? Either way one
boggles, but rather more for a turtle than a tortoise.
Some species of turtle do walk surprising distances over land; one of
them once turned up in my parents' shadehouse.
Yes, but that's in Australia, where all the animals are... unusual.
I'm no turtle expert, but I expect that there are land-crossing
turtles all over the planet.
Nor am I, but I'm fairly sure that turtles have flippers rather than feet,
except in America.
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
I have no idea what species the turtle I mentioned was, but it must
have been an escaped pet from the town that walked [1] two kilometers
across dry farmland to reach my parents' shadehouse, where it found
moisture. It was given a new home in my grandparents' pond. I don't
know if it's still there.
http://faunanet.gov.au/wos/factfile.cfm?Fact_ID=287
Anywhere but Australia, that would be a terrapin.
--
Lesley Weston.

Brightly_coloured_blob is real, but I don't often check even the few bits
that get through Yahoo's filters. To reach me, use leswes att shaw dott ca,
changing spelling and spacing as required.
Flesh-eating Dragon
2005-05-04 00:52:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lesley Weston
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
http://faunanet.gov.au/wos/factfile.cfm?Fact_ID=287
Anywhere but Australia, that would be a terrapin.
From <http://members.iinet.net.au/~bush/turtle.html>

The term "terrapin" is used in North America for some of their
turtles/tortoises. We refer to the members of this family as
turtles because of their webbed feet and aquatic behaviour. The
term "tortoise" is used for the dome-shelled, predominantly land
based tortoises, such as those found on the Galapagos Islands.

There is some false information out there, however, e.g.
http://www.decs.sa.gov.au/animalethics/a8_publish/modules/publish/content.asp?id=15932&navgrp=1037

Sometimes you may see the word terrapin used in Australia, but
generally the word tortoise is applied to all freshwater species
with clawed, webbed feet and the word turtle is used for the large
marine species with feet shaped like paddles.

That's not the only page where this incorrect information can be
found, e.g. <http://www.tortoisetrust.org/care/faq.html#difference>
(I think I might just send a quick erratum email).

I think the page I linked to before resolves this contradiction by
pointing out that the latter is an old-fashioned definition while the
former is the current convention. As it
(<http://faunanet.gov.au/wos/factfile.cfm?Fact_ID=287>) says:

In the past, all freshwater turtles were called tortoises and
marine turtles were called turtles. The more recent convention has
been to restrict the term 'tortoise' to the purely land-dwelling
species. As such, Australia has no tortoises.

I've never heard of a terrapin, except as a joke-word in ISIRTA.

Adrian.
Lesley Weston
2005-05-04 20:10:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Lesley Weston
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
http://faunanet.gov.au/wos/factfile.cfm?Fact_ID=287
Anywhere but Australia, that would be a terrapin.
From <http://members.iinet.net.au/~bush/turtle.html>
The term "terrapin" is used in North America for some of their
turtles/tortoises. We refer to the members of this family as
turtles because of their webbed feet and aquatic behaviour. The
term "tortoise" is used for the dome-shelled, predominantly land
based tortoises, such as those found on the Galapagos Islands.
As I said, anywhere but Australia.
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
There is some false information out there, however, e.g.
http://www.decs.sa.gov.au/animalethics/a8_publish/modules/publish/content.asp?
id=15932&navgrp=1037
Not only is it false, it also uses an offensive term in the first paragraph
to describe First Nations people. I rather like the idea of a work tortoise,
though; presumably they're for work that doesn't need to be done any time
soon.

<snip>
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
I've never heard of a terrapin, except as a joke-word in ISIRTA.
You get ISIRTA?! Now I'm suffering from serious continent-envy.
--
Lesley Weston.

Brightly_coloured_blob is real, but I don't often check even the few bits
that get through Yahoo's filters. To reach me, use leswes att shaw dott ca,
changing spelling and spacing as required.
Alec Cawley
2005-05-04 20:55:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lesley Weston
You get ISIRTA?! Now I'm suffering from serious continent-envy.
There is available, on the net, a CD with nearly complete recordings or
nearly every ISIRTA episode ever transmitted. All pirate, of course, so
it would be very irresponsible of me to mention
http://www.40sradio.us/imsorryillreadthatagain.htm
or sundry other websites given by Google in response to "ISIRTA CD".
--
@lec ©awley
http://www.livejournal.com/~randombler
Lesley Weston
2005-05-05 22:44:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alec Cawley
Post by Lesley Weston
You get ISIRTA?! Now I'm suffering from serious continent-envy.
There is available, on the net, a CD with nearly complete recordings or
nearly every ISIRTA episode ever transmitted. All pirate, of course, so
it would be very irresponsible of me to mention
http://www.40sradio.us/imsorryillreadthatagain.htm
or sundry other websites given by Google in response to "ISIRTA CD".
Thank you. I'm glad you weren't so irresponsible as to give the URL, but it
doesn't matter really, since I read ISIRTA as ISIHAC. I heard the actual
ISIRTA when it was new - we were still in England then - but I've never
heard ISIHAC and that's what would make me envious if it were available in
Australia. Please don't tell me it is, though I hope I can be altruistic
enough to be pleased for the Australians if it is.
--
Lesley Weston.

Brightly_coloured_blob is real, but I don't often check even the few bits
that get through Yahoo's filters. To reach me, use leswes att shaw dott ca,
changing spelling and spacing as required.
Flesh-eating Dragon
2005-05-06 01:09:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lesley Weston
Thank you. I'm glad you weren't so irresponsible as to give the URL, but it
doesn't matter really, since I read ISIRTA as ISIHAC. I heard the actual
ISIRTA when it was new - we were still in England then - but I've never
heard ISIHAC and that's what would make me envious if it were available in
Australia. Please don't tell me it is, though I hope I can be altruistic
enough to be pleased for the Australians if it is.
It is if you count availability of cassette tapes of classic episodes.
It may well be just as available in your country too if you know where
to look.

See:
http://search.abc.net.au/search/search.cgi?collection=shop&query=%22I%27m+Sorry+I+Haven%27t+A+Clue%22

Or page seven and eight of:
http://shop.abc.net.au/browse/formatcategory.asp?formatid=5&categoryid=18

Adrian.
Andy Davison
2005-05-04 23:22:07 UTC
Permalink
On Wednesday 04 May 2005 21:10, in message
Post by Lesley Weston
You get ISIRTA?! Now I'm suffering from serious continent-envy.
Why not visit the BBC7 Listen Again website. ISIRTA is on every Monday at
14:30 <http://www.bbc.co.uk/bbc7/listenagain/monday/>. Mondays are pretty
good as ISIHAC is on at 12:30 on the same day, just after The Goon Show at
noon.
--
Andy Davison
***@oiyou.force9.co.uk
Lesley Weston
2005-05-05 23:37:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy Davison
On Wednesday 04 May 2005 21:10, in message
Post by Lesley Weston
You get ISIRTA?! Now I'm suffering from serious continent-envy.
Why not visit the BBC7 Listen Again website. ISIRTA is on every Monday at
14:30 <http://www.bbc.co.uk/bbc7/listenagain/monday/>. Mondays are pretty
good as ISIHAC is on at 12:30 on the same day, just after The Goon Show at
noon.
Thankyouthankyouthankyou, oh thank you! We've just listened to our first
ever episode of ISIHAC, and it was just as good as everybody says. Until
recently we had a dial-up connection, so even listening to streamed anything
was not a reasonable option, let alone watching. Now we have a cable
connection and radio and even TV shows are just fine, but we'd got into the
habit of assuming that there was no point in trying. So we are both very
grateful to you for pointing out that there is. Now the Australians can
listen to whatever they want, I don't care.
--
Lesley Weston.

Brightly_coloured_blob is real, but I don't often check even the few bits
that get through Yahoo's filters. To reach me, use leswes att shaw dott ca,
changing spelling and spacing as required.
Michael J. Schülke
2005-05-05 23:49:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lesley Weston
Until
recently we had a dial-up connection, so even listening to streamed anything
was not a reasonable option,
Even on a dial-up connection, you can always use a media player that
supports dumping the stream to your hard disk (such as mplayer with the
-dumpstream option), so you can download at any speed you like, and
listen later.

Michael
Flesh-eating Dragon
2005-05-05 01:15:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lesley Weston
You get ISIRTA?! Now I'm suffering from serious continent-envy.
Yes, we have shops that sell some of the cassette tapes. I've got the
pack that includes the 9 June 1968, 22 March 1970, 5 April 1970 and
23 December 1973 episodes.

Adrian.
Lesley Weston
2005-05-05 23:39:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flesh-eating Dragon
Post by Lesley Weston
You get ISIRTA?! Now I'm suffering from serious continent-envy.
Yes, we have shops that sell some of the cassette tapes. I've got the
pack that includes the 9 June 1968, 22 March 1970, 5 April 1970 and
23 December 1973 episodes.
That's OK - see Andy's post.
--
Lesley Weston.

Brightly_coloured_blob is real, but I don't often check even the few bits
that get through Yahoo's filters. To reach me, use leswes att shaw dott ca,
changing spelling and spacing as required.
Andy Davison
2005-05-02 01:03:21 UTC
Permalink
On Sunday 01 May 2005 15:47, in message
Post by Lesley Weston
I know you're English, but do you really mean turtle, or are you being
courteous to transatlantics and you actually mean tortoise? Either way one
boggles, but rather more for a turtle than a tortoise.
I would have thought tortoise was more likely but he said turtle. I never
saw it (I was on the way up to Watford at the time) so I can't comment
further.
--
Andy Davison
***@oiyou.force9.co.uk
Ross
2005-05-01 16:19:33 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 30 Apr 2005 22:37:11 +0100, Andy Davison wrote in
Post by Andy Davison
I knew something odd had come up when the line controller made a radio
announcement to all Met drivers on the Uxbridge branch and started it with
"You're never going to believe this one". Apparently staff were on the
track between Hillingdon and Ickenham removing a turtle from the track. [...]
Hey, if we can get cautioned for ostriches on the line, I'm sure a
turtle is perfectly acceptable - even if the punters don't believe
either!

ISTR reading that Reading - Basingstoke workings get cautioned for
llamas every so often.
--
Ross, in Lincoln
Reply-to address will bounce; replace "junk-trap" with "me" for e-mail
Lister
2005-05-01 17:42:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ross
On Sat, 30 Apr 2005 22:37:11 +0100, Andy Davison wrote in
Post by Andy Davison
I knew something odd had come up when the line controller made a radio
announcement to all Met drivers on the Uxbridge branch and started it with
"You're never going to believe this one". Apparently staff were on the
track between Hillingdon and Ickenham removing a turtle from the track. [...]
Hey, if we can get cautioned for ostriches on the line, I'm sure a
turtle is perfectly acceptable - even if the punters don't believe
either!
ISTR reading that Reading - Basingstoke workings get cautioned for
llamas every so often.
Has Jeff Minter been around there then?
Arthur Hagen
2005-05-01 23:03:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lister
Post by Ross
Hey, if we can get cautioned for ostriches on the line, I'm sure a
turtle is perfectly acceptable - even if the punters don't believe
either!
ISTR reading that Reading - Basingstoke workings get cautioned for
llamas every so often.
Has Jeff Minter been around there then?
I thought he only did llamas.
--
*Art
Lister
2005-05-02 10:45:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arthur Hagen
Post by Lister
Post by Ross
Hey, if we can get cautioned for ostriches on the line, I'm sure a
turtle is perfectly acceptable - even if the punters don't believe
either!
ISTR reading that Reading - Basingstoke workings get cautioned for
llamas every so often.
Has Jeff Minter been around there then?
I thought he only did llamas.
Erm, yes, I refer you to the above post, which mentions llamas
Brian {Hamilton Kelly}
2005-05-04 22:29:13 UTC
Permalink
On Sunday, in article
Post by Ross
On Sat, 30 Apr 2005 22:37:11 +0100, Andy Davison wrote in
Post by Andy Davison
I knew something odd had come up when the line controller made a radio
announcement to all Met drivers on the Uxbridge branch and started it with
"You're never going to believe this one". Apparently staff were on the
track between Hillingdon and Ickenham removing a turtle from the track. [...]
Hey, if we can get cautioned for ostriches on the line, I'm sure a
turtle is perfectly acceptable - even if the punters don't believe
either!
ISTR reading that Reading - Basingstoke workings get cautioned for
llamas every so often.
AIUI, the Central Line at its eastern extremity (Ongar, Hainault, etc) is
infested with scorpions. [For the benefit of non-rightpondians,
scorpions are not native to the British Isles.]
--
Brian {Hamilton Kelly} ***@dsl.co.uk
"Je n'ai fait celle-ci plus longue que parce que je n'ai pas eu
le loisir de la faire plus courte."
Blaise Pascal, /Lettres Provinciales/, 1657
Brian Wakeling
2005-05-05 02:38:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brian {Hamilton Kelly}
On Sunday, in article
Post by Ross
On Sat, 30 Apr 2005 22:37:11 +0100, Andy Davison wrote in
Post by Andy Davison
I knew something odd had come up when the line controller
made a radio announcement to all Met drivers on the
Uxbridge branch and started it with "You're never going
to believe this one". Apparently staff were on the
track between Hillingdon and Ickenham removing a turtle
from the track. [...]
Hey, if we can get cautioned for ostriches on the line,
I'm sure a turtle is perfectly acceptable - even if the
punters don't believe either!
ISTR reading that Reading - Basingstoke workings get
cautioned for llamas every so often.
AIUI, the Central Line at its eastern extremity (Ongar,
Hainault, etc) is infested with scorpions. [For the
benefit of non-rightpondians, scorpions are not native to
the British Isles.]
When I was younger and went to visit my gran (who lives in
Eastcote[1]), I always got myself a tube map[2], and I usually
always wanted to visit Ongar because it sounded an interesting
name. Now I'm not so keen.


[1] a misleading name, as it's on the far western edge of
Greater London
[2] I'm not sure why - it have had something to do with the
pretty colours
--
Sabremeister Brian :-)
Use b dot wakeling at virgin dot net to reply
http://freespace.virgin.net/b.wakeling/index.html
"Cupid has a depressing tendency to use me for target
practice"
- Me, sometime in 2002.
Andy Davison
2005-05-05 21:54:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brian Wakeling
When I was younger and went to visit my gran (who lives in
Eastcote[1]),
[1] a misleading name, as it's on the far western edge of
Greater London
It is so called becaus eit's the Eastbourne of Middlesex. They don't let you
live there unless you can produce a pension book to prove your age :)
--
Andy Davison
***@oiyou.force9.co.uk
Karen
2005-05-06 00:00:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy Davison
Post by Brian Wakeling
When I was younger and went to visit my gran (who lives in
Eastcote[1]),
[1] a misleading name, as it's on the far western edge of
Greater London
It is so called becaus eit's the Eastbourne of Middlesex. They don't let you
live there unless you can produce a pension book to prove your age :)
Oh I thought it was the speed of the trains as they went along that area
of track :p

Is the owl still there? I haven't noticed it in a while, but it could
be simply the Horlicks express, gently rocking me deeper into my
somnambulistic state as we pass through the land of blue rinse, gliding
through a '50s time warp with tweeting birds, plenty of guards, flat
track - that is the point at which I get up and I realised the bouncing
knocked me unconscious.

The village of Brockenhurst in the New Forest - now *that* is the '50s
revisited, you can practically taste the lashings of ginger beer.
--
Karen/hypatia ***@lspace.org
New? Check http://www.lspace.org
Confused? Mail the Clue Fairies at afp-***@lspace.org
Discworld Convention 2006 - Behind the Mask - August 18-21, 2006
Brian Wakeling
2005-05-06 06:08:47 UTC
Permalink
In article
On Thursday 05 May 2005 03:38, in message
Post by Brian Wakeling
When I was younger and went to visit my gran (who lives in
Eastcote[1]),
[1] a misleading name, as it's on the far western edge of
Greater London
It is so called becaus eit's the Eastbourne of Middlesex.
They don't let you live there unless you can produce a
pension book to prove your age :)
Oh I thought it was the speed of the trains as they went
along that area of track :p
Is the owl still there?
No idea, haven't been for years
I haven't noticed it in a while,
but it could be simply the Horlicks express, gently rocking
me deeper into my somnambulistic state as we pass through
the land of blue rinse, gliding through a '50s time warp
with tweeting birds, plenty of guards, flat track - that is
the point at which I get up and I realised the bouncing
knocked me unconscious.
The village of Brockenhurst in the New Forest - now *that*
is the '50s revisited, you can practically taste the
lashings of ginger beer.
*Lashings* of ginger beer?

And people think sexual morality these days is weird...


(Yeah, it's that dark red sort of anorak thing. Ta.)
--
Sabremeister Brian :-)
Use b dot wakeling at virgin dot net to reply
http://freespace.virgin.net/b.wakeling/index.html
"Reading is sometimes an ingenious device for avoiding
thought."
- Sir Arthur Helps
Andy Davison
2005-05-06 07:15:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Karen
Oh I thought it was the speed of the trains as they went along that area
of track :p
It was yesterday. A part of a tree came down between Ruislip Manor and
Eastcote and two E/B Picc trains had to detrain onto my W/B Met because the
line controller decided against letting us try to remove it (it was too big
for the Picc driver to move on his own and the base was still attached to
the main tree trunk but I had a couple of station staff from Eastcote with
me and we could have shifted it between the lot of us). Hence a delay of
nearly an hour which need only have been perhaps ten minutes at the most.
Post by Karen
Is the owl still there?   I haven't noticed it in a while, but it could
be simply the Horlicks express, gently rocking me deeper into my
somnambulistic state as we pass through the land of blue rinse,  gliding
through a '50s time warp with tweeting birds, plenty of guards, flat
track - that is the point at which I  get up and I realised the bouncing
knocked me unconscious.
Yes the owl is still there but it stopped working ages ago. It was quite
funny to see the crow standing on the monitor, pecking the owl and standing
back as though saying "Come and have a go if you think you're hard enough".
They had to resort to those plastic spikes on the monitor to keep the
birds, particularly the crow and one of the collared doves, off. The track
between Rayner's Lane and Eastcote is notoriously bad. I think it's the
track bed needs looking at. Metronet were forced into doing something there
last year when all the drivers refused to exceed 30mph because of the
excessive sideplay. Whatever they did was obviously only a stop-gap repair
as it's starting to get bad again. I think they need to dig it all up and
re-lay it properly at some point but there are worse bits than that and
Metronet won't want to do anything to threaten their £50 million annual
profits so it won't be in the near future.
--
Andy Davison
***@oiyou.force9.co.uk
Lesley Weston
2005-05-06 17:08:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy Davison
Post by Karen
Oh I thought it was the speed of the trains as they went along that area
of track :p
It was yesterday. A part of a tree came down between Ruislip Manor and
Eastcote and two E/B Picc trains had to detrain onto my W/B Met because the
line controller decided against letting us try to remove it (it was too big
for the Picc driver to move on his own and the base was still attached to
the main tree trunk but I had a couple of station staff from Eastcote with
me and we could have shifted it between the lot of us). Hence a delay of
nearly an hour which need only have been perhaps ten minutes at the most.
But then whoever's job it is to remove trees from lines wouldn't have got
paid - you (generic) can't take other people's rice-bowls away, even if it
does inconvenience commuters. Presumably you have books and other amusements
with you for just such an eventuality?

<snip>
Post by Andy Davison
The track
between Rayner's Lane and Eastcote is notoriously bad. I think it's the
track bed needs looking at. Metronet were forced into doing something there
last year when all the drivers refused to exceed 30mph because of the
excessive sideplay. Whatever they did was obviously only a stop-gap repair
as it's starting to get bad again. I think they need to dig it all up and
re-lay it properly at some point but there are worse bits than that and
Metronet won't want to do anything to threaten their £50 million annual
profits so it won't be in the near future.
Business as usual, then, in all senses.
--
Lesley Weston.

Brightly_coloured_blob is real, but I don't often check even the few bits
that get through Yahoo's filters. To reach me, use leswes att shaw dott ca,
changing spelling and spacing as required.
Andy Davison
2005-05-07 01:41:44 UTC
Permalink
On Friday 06 May 2005 18:08, in message
Post by Lesley Weston
But then whoever's job it is to remove trees from lines wouldn't have got
paid - you (generic) can't take other people's rice-bowls away, even if it
does inconvenience commuters. Presumably you have books and other
amusements with you for just such an eventuality?
Of course they get paid. The Emergency Response Unit are sent out to deal
with things like that. That's what they sit around waiting for. Well, that
and replacing missing track bolts when the bolshie bastard drivers slow
down to 5mph until the track's bolted together properly (while making
announcements to the passengers to tell them why the train is going so
slow). The ERU is part of LUL rather than Metronet or Tubelines so things
can get done even when the private maintenance companies sit around arguing
about whose responsibility something is and therefore who has to pay.
--
Andy Davison
***@oiyou.force9.co.uk
Lesley Weston
2005-05-07 17:41:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy Davison
On Friday 06 May 2005 18:08, in message
Post by Lesley Weston
But then whoever's job it is to remove trees from lines wouldn't have got
paid - you (generic) can't take other people's rice-bowls away, even if it
does inconvenience commuters. Presumably you have books and other
amusements with you for just such an eventuality?
Of course they get paid. The Emergency Response Unit are sent out to deal
with things like that. That's what they sit around waiting for. Well, that
and replacing missing track bolts when the bolshie bastard drivers slow
down to 5mph until the track's bolted together properly (while making
announcements to the passengers to tell them why the train is going so
slow). The ERU is part of LUL rather than Metronet or Tubelines so things
can get done even when the private maintenance companies sit around arguing
about whose responsibility something is and therefore who has to pay.
That's good - so the system hasn't broken down completely, then, just
mostly.
--
Lesley Weston.

Brightly_coloured_blob is real, but I don't often check even the few bits
that get through Yahoo's filters. To reach me, use leswes att shaw dott ca,
changing spelling and spacing as required.
Thomas Zahr
2005-05-06 19:42:57 UTC
Permalink
Karen posted:

...
Post by Karen
The village of Brockenhurst in the New Forest - now *that*
is the '50s revisited, you can practically taste the
lashings of ginger beer.
Which reminds me somehow of Paul Temple, it's something he
and Steve might have done ...
--
Ciao

Thomas =:-)
<sometimes RL is such a drag>
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